Tag Archive: University of Delaware

Uncle Sam as Shareholder and Regulator

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The regulatory burden on U.S. public companies continues to increase and the government’s role has expanded from that of just regulator to, in some cases, shareholder. That might leave some directors wondering how far into the boardroom Uncle Sam can reach.

A panel of financial industry and government experts convened last fall to discuss the influence of the federal government when it acts as either a shareholder or a regulator. The Clearing House Association and the University of Delaware’s John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance facilitated the discussion with a program called The Government as Regulator and/or Shareholder—The Impact on Director Duties, which  included the following speakers and panel members:

  • Rolin P. Bissell, partner, Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor LLP
  • Amy Borrus, interim executive director, Council of Institutional Investors
  • Laban P. Jackson, Jr., director, JP Morgan Chase & Co.
  • Peter A. Langerman, CEO, Franklin Mutual Advisers, LLC
  • Giovanni P. Prezioso, partner, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP
  • Gregg L. Rozansky, managing director, The Clearing House Association
  • Mary Schapiro, former chair, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
  • Collins J. Seitz, Jr., justice, Supreme Court of Delaware

Charles M. Elson, director of the Weinberg Center and professor of finance, moderated the discussion.

The panel offered a wide range of perspectives, but a few common themes emerged that are applicable to directors across a variety of industries.  

Most panelists agreed that the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act was a response proportional to the 2008 global financial crisis, but expressed frustration with certain government bailouts and the political motivations influencing them. Several panelists indicated they felt uneasy about the broad scale of intervention that the federal government made into the private sector to bail out failing companies. The panelists cited the example of the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank’s $85 billion bailout of American International Group (AIG) to illustrate how far agencies reached—even in the face of the internal corruption at the company. AIG’s credit default swaps lost the company $30 billion and are often blamed as a major reason the company collapsed in 2008. Controversy swirled when in March 2009, publicly disclosed information revealed that after the bailout, employees of AIG’s financial services division were going to be paid $218 million in bonuses. A June 2010 report by the Congressional Oversight Panel (COP)—a five-member group created by Congress in 2008 to oversee the U.S. Treasury’s actions—concluded that the Federal Reserve Board’s close relations to powerful people on Wall Street influenced its decision to help AIG.

While the panelists were critical of the bailouts, they agreed that Dodd-Frank was a reasonable response to help prevent future failure of companies. Directors’ bandwidth, however, to address their corporation’s most important strategic matters, including emerging risks, may be limited by the need to spend time ensuring compliance with Dodd-Frank. Most agreed that they do not expect a lessening of regulations in the near future.

Panelists also agreed that the Delaware court system—one of the most powerful legal arbiters of U.S. corporate governance—is not designed to address scenarios in which the federal government acts as an investor. When the federal government intervenes by investing in a company to salvage it, the government becomes a shareholder with greater legal privileges than a traditional, human shareholder who might challenge corporate decisions in the Delaware courts. In the event that the government challenges a company in the federal court system, the federal government would be tried in legal institutions where the ultimate power of appeal is granted by its own founding documents. Challenges to federal sovereign immunity and the federal government as shareholder would be difficult, if not impossible, to navigate.

The line between the government as a stockholder and regulator could be blurred when the regulatory influence over the company is pervasive. This issue may be particularly acute for wholly owned subsidiaries of public companies when the government closely reviews company decision-making and expresses views on what is in the best interest of the subsidiary.

Relationships between regulators and directors—though once strained by mistrust after the financial crisis—are beginning to improve. A panelist observed that, in several global markets, relationships between regulators and directors have steadily normalized over the past year and a half, in contrast to more tense interactions of previous years. As global regulatory standards are established, markets recover and stabilize, and businesses and regulators deepen their understanding of each other.

Forming relationships with regulators should be a strategic priority for directors. Most panelists insisted that good relationships with representatives from regulatory agencies are essential. Boards should aim to keep a level of candor with regulatory contacts that could be helpful when pushing back against regulatory action and when directors have suggestions for upcoming regulations. Directors should also acknowledge that regulators have an important function to carry out in a high-pressure, multi-stakes market environment that is a challenge to navigate for regulators and companies alike. A “kicking and screaming” approach to relationships with regulators was frowned upon, as it is not productive and is insensitive to the fact that developing or implementing regulation is demanding and complex.

Directors seeking to strengthen their oversight of corporate compliance and ethics programs can access the National Association of Corporate Directors’ (NACD) publication Director Essentials: Strengthening Compliance and Ethics Oversight. The guide provides an overview of the board’s role in compliance oversight and offers practical insights about fulfilling regulatory expectations.

Self-Reflection: Three Questions Boards Must Answer

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The stakes are higher than ever before. Public expectations are greater than ever before. It is an immensely challenging business environment in which boards must now play a decisively stronger role to ensure the highest standards of corporate governance.

To that end, boards need to embark on a continuous process of self-assessment. We cannot do better tomorrow until we ask ourselves an important question: How are we doing today? Only where self-reflection is part of the board’s DNA can it provide the strategic guidance that defines its mission.

While many large and small questions drive self-reflection, three essential questions begin the process.

  • Are we independent?

There are often fundamental warning signs that a board is no longer thinking independently and that self-interest may be clouding its judgment. One is tenure. How long has each member served? Is it possible that, as a result of many years of service, some members have become too narrow in their perspective or that their own personal investment in the company might create a conflict when big decisions need to be made?

“It is generally agreed that director perspectives on a particular company can become stale and even compromised after many years of continued service,” according to the Bridging Board Gaps report by the Columbia Business School and the University of Delaware. “It may be difficult to remain objective about a company one has served for a long time.”

In other instances, circumstance simply makes independent judgment impossible. If a family business goes public, for example, family members cannot function as independent-thinking board members.

The self-reflection that a board needs to assess its own independence has to be a tough-minded, conscientious process. Hard questions need to be asked. But the board that has the courage to ask itself the hard questions is all the more likely to have the courage to act decisively to address critical problems in the future.

  • Do we have chemistry?

There has to be some real chemistry in the boardroom if discussions are to be open and free-wheeling. Board members have to trust each other. They have to feel free to float new ideas and challenge others. They don’t have to be best friends, but board members need a sense of camaraderie to assure a creative group dynamic.

An attentive, enthusiastic and engaged board means more efficient decision-making. Are your board members attentive, engaged and active? Are there certain directors who are not? Is there some adjustment, some way to change the chemistry to ignite a higher level of enthusiasm?

  • Do we have the right team?

Having the right team means building a well-constructed board, with members from a variety of backgrounds who are ready to meet the challenges ahead. Having the right team means a broad range of skills, talents and perspectives that can feed the company’s strategy in multiple contexts. It is a competitive necessity, reflecting varied work experiences, personal backgrounds and educational training.

Really think about your board composition. Do the directors around the table offer a diverse mix of industry experience? Do you have expertise across various disciplines such as operations, marketing and finance? Watch out for too much expertise in any one industry. Whatever the company’s business, independent input is essential if the board is to advise on the multiple opportunities and problems that confront management.

In fact, board members are often all the more valuable when they can see the company as other stakeholders see it.

Self-reflection is a never-ending process. Questions about your independence, chemistry and  diversity must be constantly revisited and broadened to ensure optimal service.

Self-reflection is also a challenging initiative.  Performing an objective, holistic evaluation of your board may require the engagement of independent professionals who stand ready to provide the benefits of their significant experience and intellectual capital.

Sometimes others need to see you before you can really see yourself.

Some New Things Under the Governance Sun

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“There is nothing new under the sun,” complained the author of Ecclesiastes. This old lament comes to mind when I hear about “new” solutions in governance. I can usually find a precedent near at hand—whether it is something we have done here at NACD within the director community, or else a solution we’ve seen coming from other governance groups such as managers, shareholders, and professionals.

But I have to say that Bridging Board Gaps: Report of the Study Group on Corporate Boards, released in late April, contains some new perspectives and some new thinking.

A New Gathering

The Study Group on Corporate Boards is new in the breadth of its representation across U.S. public company governance and, frankly, the celebrity status of its members. At NACD we take pride in our Blue Ribbon Commission reports, which bring together a diverse group of participants in governance. The Study Group assembled an equally strong group with a wide range of backgrounds and affiliations.

Study Group Co-Chair Charles Elson

Co-Chairs Charles Elson, University of Delaware; Glenn Hubbard, Columbia Business School; and Vice-Chair Frank Zarb, Hellman and Friedman, currently serve on a total of seven major corporate boards. The Study Group also includes other prominent corporate directors, plus an array of retired chief executives, senior managers, shareholders and professional advisors of note, and also two retired jurists—Chief Justice E. Norman Veasey, retired from the Delaware Supreme Court, and Chancellor William T. Allen, retired from the Delaware Court of Chancery.

Also serving in the Study Group is Arthur Levitt, former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission; former Treasury Department Secretary Paul O’Neill; former general counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission, David Becker; and a representative of organized labor, Damon Silvers, policy director and special counsel of the AFL-CIO. The group even includes Jon Hanson, chairman emeritus of the National Football Foundation and a director of the

Study Group Co-Chair Glenn Hubbard

company that owns the New York Yankees.

New Ideas

So exactly what did the Study Group say that was new? The main message of their report is twofold:

1. There are natural limits to what boards (as part-time nonmanagers), by definition, can do, and we all need to face those limits and adapt to them. Previous reports leave this difficult truth unaddressed.

2. Even given these limits, some boards are falling short of their potential.

The Study Group identified seven gaps: gaps in purpose, culture, leadership, information, advice, debate, and self-renewal. Every member made a significant contribution to the discussion. My own area of focus was the issue of information asymmetry, which I have addressed in a number of NACD publications. Management will always know more than the board about the company; that gap is inevitable, but it can be narrowed.

In my view, however, the truly new message in the report lies in the last three areas: advice, debate, and self-renewal. Boards are not investing enough in advisors; their fear of treading on management’s toes leads to serious gaps in knowledge. Also, boards are too deferential in their discussions. Rigorous debate is required and there is also a place for outright dissent (votes need not always be, as they usually are, unanimous). And finally, the third message that to me seems quite new is the suggestion that although obviously evaluation is the best way to refresh board membership, boards should consider term limits—a backstop that fewer than one in ten corporate boards have implemented, according to NACD research.

A New Start

Although as a lifelong auditor, I am constitutionally incapable of being star struck, I must say it was an honor to serve with this distinguished group. Indeed, I can’t imagine any American man or woman of business being uninterested in what this unique and high-caliber team has to say. I commend this report to the attention of every corporate director, and to all who care about free enterprise in America and in our global economy.

Get the Report and Discuss Its Recommendations with Jon Hanson, Charles Elson, and Ken Daly

Ken Daly and Charles Elson will be joined by fellow Study Group member Jon Hanson to discuss the recommendations in their report at the Master Class NACD will conduct in Wilmington, DE, June 7- 8, 2011. The Master Class is open to experienced directors only, and is best suited to lead directors and committee chairs. Check out the full agenda here. To register for the Master Class, where you will receive a complimentary copy of the Study Group report, click here.