Tag Archive: Strategy

Five Leading Practices for Governing Innovation

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Technology is eroding traditional lines between industries and creating opportunities for innovators to disrupt incumbents. Findings from the 2017-2018 NACD Public Company Governance Survey suggest that boards are increasingly concerned about how to navigate technology disruption, with one third of respondents citing this as a trend likely to have the greatest impact on their company in the coming year. The rapid pace of change presents a significant challenge for boards as they look to sharpen their oversight. As such, directors, and the management teams they oversee, are searching for strategies that will enable them to adapt quickly to shifts in the business landscape.

Nichole Jordan speaks with directors.

The National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD), in collaboration with audit and tax specialist Grant Thornton, recently cohosted a director’s roundtable in Chicago, Illinois, where directors and industry experts discussed the tactics that have helped them learn at the pace of disruptive innovation. Special guests from Amazon Web Services (AWS) were also present. Nichole Jordan, national managing partner of clients, markets, and industries at Grant Thornton, discussed the following strategies for getting out ahead of disruptors based on her engagement with clients.

1. Utilize leading technology conferences and events. There are many reputable conferences and events centered around technology and innovation that directors should consider attending each year. These gatherings bring together renowned innovators and thinkers, providing attendees with an insider view that many outside of the technology industry do not have access to. This year, NACD partnered with Grant Thornton to host a group of directors for the CES Experience, a curated, board-focused tour of the Consumer Electronic Show (CES)—the world’s largest and most influential technology show. Participants were introduced to novel products and services and spoke with their peers about potential disruptions to their companies and industries. Outside of CES, Jordan suggested that directors also attend South by Southwest and The Wall Street Journal’s Future of Everything conference, among others.

2. Visit domestic and international companies at the forefront of innovation. Corporate executives and directors can now access the innovation centers of leading technology companies including Amazon.com, Google, Microsoft Corp., and Apple. Through offerings as varied as tours of innovative hubs, executive immersion programs, and corporate strategy sessions, boards can gain valuable insights into disruptive trends and how these may impact their own businesses.

Geoff Nyheim, director of US central area at AWS, provided an example of an insurance carrier taking advantage of Amazon’s offering. The insurance carrier was particularly concerned with the predicted growth of autonomous vehicles and the potential impact on their industry. The CEO brought his direct reports to AWS, where they spent three days talking through strategy under the premise that insurance claims would plummet due to disruption caused by the safety of autonomous vehicles. According to Nyheim, “when [operating under] that assumption, all sorts of different paths and creative ideas emerged” for the future of the company. Nyheim added that “a lot of other companies are in the same place, [but to their detriment] lack a similar urgency.”

One director commented that it’s just as important for boards and their management teams to get out of the country to visit innovation centers in India, China, and other emerging markets as it is to visit the ones to home. On such a trip to India, the director visited a General Electric Co. factory that produced equipment used to create computerized tomography (CT) scans, and was amazed by the advanced tools and research that he saw. Directors should find ways to experience a similar sense of wonder that’s applicable to their own industries.

3. Cultivate a collaborative business mentality. Though possibly counterintuitive, businesses need to consider building a sustainable ecosystem of partners for themselves. Jordan called out companies in Grant Thornton’s ecosystem, naming, “Amazon Web Services and NACD as partners.” Directors should challenge members of management to consider developing a set of networks, partnerships, or alliances that can be tapped into to generate and implement innovative solutions. One director agreed, citing an internal study at his company which found that “less than five percent of ideas [generated within the company] actually came to fruition.” The company makes large investments in research, leading the director to conclude that part of the problem may be that it is relying too heavily “on [its] own resources and [is too] unwilling to trust others to help in the innovation process,” one director said. He also briefly outlined how companies can leverage networks to collaborate with a trusted supplier. The tactic assumes that a supplier “gets ten percent of revenue from [your company, so you ask the supplier if they would be willing to] take that ten percent and put it towards creating products for [your company].” This kind of thinking can lead to mutually beneficial and innovative engagements that enhance operational effectiveness.

4. Integrate technology briefings into your daily routine. Directors should be purposeful about incorporating reading about technology into their everyday lives, and can do so by seeking out reputable publications that report on the business of technology. The Wall Street Journal’s technology department, Recode, TechCrunch, and Wired magazine are widely considered reliable publications that bridge the gap between management and technology. Following leading organizations and their CEOs on social media—Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, Shelley Palmer, or Gary Shapiro, for instance—can also enrich directors’ technology diets. One participant observed that maintaining relationships with individuals in late-stage venture capital funds can also facilitate learning. Venture capitalists “evaluate hundreds [if not] thousands of proposals,” she said, and could keep directors apprised of bleeding-edge developments.

5. Monitor your company’s progress on innovation relative to its customers. Effective benchmarking of technology initiatives’ success will vary from company to company. As such, innovation efforts should be wedded to the current and future needs of its customers. Jeffrey Traylor, head of AWS solutions architecture for the US Central area at Amazon, Traylor suggested Amazon’s value of working backwards as a strategy for customer-centered innovation. “Before we [even] write the first line of code, we write a press release for three years from now, then write an FAQ,” Traylor said. “We ask [ourselves the following]: Who is the customer? What problem are we solving? What are the most important benefits to the customer? What does the customer experience look like?” For Amazon, innovation is about high intentionality and requires planning out how any new offering will benefit the end-user’s experience.

The board should also ensure that management views emerging technologies as a means to achieving long-term value creation, rather than an end in itself. As noted by a director at the event who oversees a company in the healthcare and life sciences industry, companies cannot succeed sustainably if they don’t innovate alongside the customer. “When we talk about innovation, it’s the people whose lives we’re going to make better. We innovate around the patients,” she said. For her company, “It’s not just about [developing a different] drug delivery system or [a new] device, [but rather] how can we prevent unexpected events, and connect caregivers and care systems to the patient.”

Jeffrey Burgess, national managing partner of audit services at Grant Thornton, rounded out the conversation, pointing out that innovation should not only be limited to the board and management, but also be instilled at every level of the company. “I think [of] innovation [as] more and more on the front lines,” Burgess said.  “You need a culture [that] embraces change, and you need change management methodologies, procedures, and processes that drive innovation.” To meet these challenges, directors need to ensure that they are surrounded by intellectually curious and well-informed peers who can work with management to develop a forward-looking vision for the company. As Traylor cautioned, companies with boards that do not cultivate this curiosity may leave themselves vulnerable to the “ruthless and unsparing” effect of innovation.

Top 10 Insights From NACD’s Master Class in Fort Lauderdale

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Ashley Marchand OrmeNACD’s thought-leadership forum, Master Class, convened in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, late last year to discuss how corporate governance is adapting to the current operating environment. Dialogue among directors and session leaders at the event revealed 10 insightful takeaways:

  1. Board engagement in strategy development is a sign of healthy board-management engagement. The board’s role is to question the CEO’s strategy assumptions, offer alternatives, and ensure a long-term value creation. Senior management’s job is to execute the strategy.
  1. Given the complexity of today’s operating environment, it is even more important to stay attuned to disruptive competition in the company’s industry. Spend time outside of board meetings learning which changes—in technology, policy, or through stakeholder demands, for example—are emerging and how your company should address those disruptions.
  1. Demonstrate directors’ commitment to continued education in communications with shareholders, employees, and other stakeholders. While your board may feel that current director evaluations and education requirements are sufficient, review your director education program to ensure that board members’ skills are being enhanced to keep pace with the changing operating environment.
  1. Consider taking a few steps to enhance recruitment of and onboarding for new directors:
    • Consider not only the board’s recruitment needs in the next year, but also in the next several years as directors leave the board and as company strategy evolves.
    • Establish a requirement that the director pipeline includes candidates from diverse backgrounds.
    • Provide a welcome letter with job description to new board members.
    • Tailor new-director onboarding programs to individual directors.
    • Convey a sense of your board’s dynamics with each other and with management to both prospective and new directors.
  1. Determine whether the skillset matrix tests for skills that are necessary for the company strategy. While directors currently serving on the board may have had the skills to help the company achieve its prior strategy, realize that the directors sitting on the board today should be measured against the new ruler of current and future strategy expectations.
  1. Review your board’s bylaws and committee charters to determine whether the documents offer any detail about how directors oversee cultural risk. Probe management about culture. Given recent corporate scandals relating to unhealthy corporate culture, consider adding language to your bylaws and charters to demonstrate a commitment to healthy company culture. Take this commitment a step forward by probing management about how the company currently cultivates a healthy, ethical culture.
  1. Look beyond the information management has presented you to determine the company’s cultural dynamics among not only senior management, but also lower- and mid-level managers. Review online employee satisfaction websites to gauge morale and determine whether behaviors incentivized are realistic and healthy.
  1. Question the quality and volume of information being given to the board on enterprise risks. If the board is receiving 1,000 pages of information monthly about risks, ask whether the board can realistically absorb that information. Ask the chief risk officer to provide the board with a more brief and concentrated view of the risks that need to be addressed, and spend time drilling down on the most pertinent risks, including those that may be sleeping giants.
  1. When stumped on strategy, go back to the beginning. Ask often why the company was founded and what problem the company should help clients or consumers solve. Having a renewed vision of the founder’s mission can help provide fodder as to how to revive that vision in light of today’s operating environment.
  1. Dive deep into consumer trends and behaviors, when considering appropriate strategies. While it may be easy to become mired in the highly technical nature of directorship and oversight, realize that great insight can come from aligning company strategy so that it satisfies customers’ needs and wants.

Add your voice to the next critical conversation. View upcoming NACD Master Class dates.

Help Your Company to Face Its Future Confidently

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Jim DeLoach

Jim DeLoach

The uncertainty of looking to the future presses boards to consider how confident their senior executives and supporting teams are in executing strategy. How can the board help the companies they oversee to face the future with a greater sense of confidence?

Confidence is neither a cliché nor an assertion of mere optimism. Rather, it is a quality that drives leaders and their companies forward. The Oxford English Dictionary defines confidence as “the state of feeling certain about the truth of something” and “a feeling of self-assurance arising from one’s appreciation of one’s own abilities or qualities.” This definition focuses on the board and management’s appreciation of the collective capabilities of the enterprise, including the ability to carry out a company’s vision. It raises three fundamental questions:

  • Do we know where we’re going directionally and why? Are our people committed to achieving a common vision that is clearly articulated, meaningful, and aspirational?
  • Are we prepared for the journey? Does our staff have the capabilities to execute our strategy? Do we have a great team, a strong roadmap, and the required processes, systems and alliances, and sufficient resources to sustain our journey?
  • Do we possess the ability, will, and discipline to cope with change along the way, no matter what happens? Does our board have the mental toughness to stay on course? Is our management team agile and adaptive enough to recognize market opportunities and emerging risks, and capitalize on, endure, or overcome them by making timely adjustments to strategy and capabilities?

Definitive, positive responses to these questions from the board will enable confidence across the organization.

Looking back on experiences working with successful companies, seven attributes were identified that organizations must have when facing the uncertainty of future markets.

How to Build the Foundation for Confidence

  1. Confident organizations share commitment to a vision. Commitment to a vision provides a shared “future pull” that is both inspiring and motivating. This perspective fuels enterprise-wide focus and energy to learn, which encourages participation and altruistic camaraderie. An effective vision crafted by the board and executive team leads people at all levels of a company to recognize that the enterprise’s success and their personal success are inextricably linked.
  2. Confident organizations have a heightened awareness of the environment. A confident organization constantly reality tests its market understanding by facilitating effective listening to customers, suppliers, employees, and other stakeholders. Boards should encourage companies to generate sources of new learning, encouraging systemic thinking in distilling and acting on the environment feedback received, with the objective of driving continuous improvement. The confident organization fosters a culture of sharing and supports formal and informal continuous feedback loops to flatten the organization, get closer to the customer, and promote a preparedness mindset.
  3. Confident organizations align their required capabilities. It is a never-ending priority of the board to ensure that the right talent and capabilities are in place to achieve differentiation in the marketplace and execute strategies successfully. Capabilities include an enterprise’s superior know-how, innovative processes, proprietary systems, distinctive brands, collaborative cultures, and a unique set of supplier and customer relationships.

How to Sustain Confidence

Achieving a foundation of confidence is necessary, but alone is not enough without concerted efforts to sustain confidence. Astute directors and executives know that the ability, will, and discipline to cope with change are also needed to sustain their journey. Those winning traits are enabled by the attributes below.

  1. Confident organizations are risk-savvy. The confident organization is secure in the knowledge that it has considered all plausible risk scenarios, knows its breakpoint in the event of extreme scenarios, and has effective response plans in place (including plans to exit the strategy if circumstances warrant). Most importantly, the confident organization should have an effective early-warning capability in place to alert decision-makers of changes in the marketplace that affect the validity of critical strategic assumptions. In a truly confident organization, no idea or person is above challenge and contrarian views are welcomed.
  2. Confident organizations learn aggressively. Confident organizations improve their learning by: creating centers of excellence; embracing cutting-edge technology to drive the vision forward; fostering an open, transparent environment of ongoing knowledge sharing, networking, collaboration, and team learning; perceiving admission of errors as a strength and requiring learning from the missteps; and converting lessons learned into process improvements. Aggressive learning stimulates the collective genius of the entire enterprise.
  3. Confident organizations place a premium on creativity. Innovation should be an integral part of the corporate DNA of the confident company, and should be evidenced by setting accountability for results with innovation-focused metrics at the organizational, process, and individual levels to encourage and reward creativity. Companies committed to innovation have the creative capacity to take advantage of market opportunities and respond to emerging risks. When innovation is a strategic imperative, companies empower and reward their employees to take the appropriate risks to realize new ideas without encumbering them with the fear of repercussions if they aren’t successful.
  4. Confident organizations are resilient. Confident organizations have adaptive processes supported by disciplined decision-making, and are committed to adapt early to continuous and disruptive change. They have the will to stay the course when the going gets tough, and are prepared to act decisively to revise strategic plans in response to changing market realities. They do not allow competitors to gain advantage by building large capital reserves, having great relationships with their lenders, and by cultivating trusting relationships with their customers, vendors and shareholders. The strategies that their boards approve include triggers for contingency plans that directors and management will implement if certain predetermined events occur or conditions arise.

In summary, the speed of change continues to escalate, creating more uncertainty about future developments and outcomes. If there was ever a time for a board to assess an organization’s confidence, we believe it is now. It’s one thing to have a confident CEO, but if the people within the entity lack confidence, the organization itself may not have the creativity and resiliency needed to sustain a winning strategy.


Jim DeLoach is managing director with Protiviti, a global consulting firm.