Tag Archive: Richard Levick

NACD Featured Conference Session: What Social Media Means to Your Board

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In the new era of digital media, just 140 characters on Twitter have the potential to affect a company’s reputation and severely impact its brand. In this communications minefield, it is essential that boards stay up-to-date on their companies’ social media strategies.

While directors should consider the defensive mechanisms in place, social media presents more than threats to cyber security and reputation. Websites such as Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn can create new opportunities for brand-building, instantaneous communication, and increased engagement with stakeholders.

A session at the upcoming NACD Board Leadership Conference, “Social Media and Reputational Risk,” will help directors dig in and discuss both the risks and advantages that viral communications present. The panelists include some of today’s top experts in the field:

Richard Levick, Esq., president and CEO of LEVICK

Levick represents countries and companies in the highest-stakes global communications matters—from the Wall Street crisis and the Gulf oil spill to Guantanamo Bay and the Catholic Church. Levick was honored for the past three years on NACD Directorship’s list of the 100 most influential people in the boardroom and corporate governance community and has been named to multiple professional halls of fame for lifetime achievement. LEVICK’s digital team is a communications industry leader, deploying potent social media resources on behalf of clients worldwide.

Allan Grafman, CEO, All Media Ventures; chairman, Majesco Entertainment

Grafman monetizes content and investor capital for owners of intellectual property. As president of All Media Ventures, he advises investors, content owners, and media companies.

Grafman is chairman of Majesco Entertainment, a video game producer and distributor. He also serves on the board of directors at Big Tent (licensing), Pixfusion (technology), and is an operating partner at Mercury Capital Partners. He publishes frequently (Directors and Boards, NACD Directorship, Licensing Book, Inventors Digest) and contributes to MSNBC’s “Your Business.”

All of this experience has uniquely positioned Grafman to provide insight—from within multiple technology industries—into the importance of social media as a key component of any corporate strategy.

Fay Feeney, CEO, Risk for Good

Fay Feeney, a self-described “digital whisperer,” is a trusted advisor to corporate boards and executives on the newest trends in business and social media. Feeney founded Risk for Good to advise board chairs, CEOs, the C-Suite, and the entire boardroom on how they can fast track their learnings in a digital world. In addition, Feeney provides strategic insights on how to connect to real time information, whether it’s found on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, or Google. This is a competency that will strengthen directors’ “duty of care,” while improving their governance of these emerging strategic risks.

Feeney is a regular attendee at governance education events and is an NACD Governance Fellow. Her insights at conferences have always proven fruitful and her participation in this panel is sure to help directors develop their digital skills.

Neil S. Braun, director, IMAX Corp.; dean, Pace University

Braun has done it all: entrepreneur, corporate attorney, and television network president and CEO. He has been managed and mentored by some of the world’s best executives and, in turn, has had the opportunity to manage and mentor other talented people who have gone on to great success. He currently serves as the dean of the Lubin School of Business at Pace University.

Braun began his career in 1977 as a corporate attorney for the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison and later joined a client of the firm, International Film Investors (an SBIC), where as senior vice president he structured and negotiated financing and distribution for feature films, including Gandhi, The Killing Fields, Hopscotch, Escape from New York, and The Howling. He has also served as president and COO of Imagine Films Entertainment as well as chairman and CEO of Viacom Entertainment. In this capacity, Braun was responsible for the turnaround of the production/distribution division for prime-time network programming. Continuing his career in the media, Braun served as president of the NBC Television Network and a GE corporate officer. Most recently, he has served as president and COO of Vanguard Animation LLC, which he founded with the producer of the Shrek animated feature franchise.

This is a small sampling of the long career that has uniquely suited Braun to comment on the issues challenging companies today, specifically in the realm of social networks.

Please join this distinguished panel at the “Social Media and Reputational Risk” session at the NACD Board Leadership Conference, and learn how to succeed as a director in the age of social media.

The conference will be held Oct. 14-16 at the Gaylord National Resort inNationalHarbor, M.D.—just minutes from downtown D.C.

A Ballroom Filled with Board Members: Take Your Places for the Conference Cotillion

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“You’ll have to get on your dancing shoes” said Donna as we watched the Dancing with the Stars finale the other night, and I must admit a shudder ran through me.

“What do you mean?” I asked, worried that she was going to suggest a Latin salsa class or sign me up for the square dance squad at church. My toes refuse to twinkle and I am to ballroom dance what hippos are to hip hop.

Hines Ward. He's no Ken Daly

“Well, I see the NACD conference site is open for business” said my wife “and you know how quickly your dance card fills up every October in DC.”

She’s right. Our conference has sold out for the last two years and we’re expecting more than 800 directors at the JW Marriott in Washington, DC from October 2-4 this fall. It’s great to see chapter leaders, members I first met at roundtables or education events, Board Leadership Fellows and our own NACD board, but it sure is hard to find time to take a turn around the floor with everyone—and to break in on all the interesting networking conversations going on left, right and center.

Conference is like a cotillion, and at all hours of the day and night board members from companies big and small, public and private, from all over America and, increasingly, all over the world, are in constant, swirling motion. You’ll definitely need your comfy shoes.

Like everyone else who makes certain to attend, I like to catch as many break outs as possible. There are 24 this year and it takes the speed and stamina of Maksim Chmerkovskiy to run between them. One definitely not to miss: Bonnie Hill from the board of Yum Brands, Jim Brady from the board of Constellation Energy, former Governor Bill Owens from Colorado at the time of Columbine, and communications guru Richard Levick talking about the board’s role in crisis planning and management in the year of the beef taco, Fukushima and political volatility all over the world.

We have a full day of programming on Sunday this year: plan to attend one of five board committee forums or get to know fellow directors by joining our special private tours of the Capitol or the National Archives.

 

Sir Peter Bonfield

As I write, Sir Peter Bonfield, who has contributed a lifetime to driving international technology innovation and who now sits on the board of Sony Corporation (among others) has agreed to join the opening plenary on Global Governance  with Ambassador Roz Ridgway and our board member Michele Hooper (who Sir Peter knows from the board of AstraZeneca) . It’s a small world—although The Honorable Barbara Hackman Franklin and The Honorable Charlene Barshefsky may beg to differ. They’ll be sharing their view from 30,000 feet on one of the rare occasions when they are not in the air flying to China or other far flung hot spots.

Members of our latest Blue Ribbon Commission on Effective Lead Directors will take the stage as will The Honorable Leo Strine from the Delaware Court of Chancery. As usual, you won’t be able to turn around without bumping into a big name from the business world or someone from the Administration or the Hill. As always, thanks to our fantastic line-up of sponsors who make it possible for us to offer you an event of this size and scale.

Myrtle Potter

I am looking forward to meeting Medco director Myrtle Potter who is based on the West Coast and catching up with Chris Kubasik, President and COO of Lockheed Martin and a board member at USO—an organization that I am sure is close to all our hearts. I know you will have your own “dance card” of movers and shakers in the world of governance. Just remember, you can’t be part of the fun if you don’t make it to the ballroom floor. Register now and I look forward to seeing you twirl by in the middle of all the excitement this October in Washington DC.

Check out all the conference speakers here.

Chief Engagement Officer and the Engagement Oversight Committee

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Don't forget to sparkle

 A recent blog by British twitter maven Lucy Marcus got me thinking about where new thinking and fresh strategy comes from. Lucy rightly points out that new beginnings take time and that, in this cost-conscious era, there is a risk that no company has the patience to sew seeds and give them time to grow. We’ll call this impatience, and certainly it is a failing that often besets the super-bright who are restless company executives, and their peripatetic counterparts who become board members.

There are other stumbling blocks in the way of innovation too, and chief amongst them is information overload. At NACD’s recent Investor Insights Roundtable , Denny Beresford revealed that he had seen proxy statements that were longer than the 10-K. Anne Sheehan, director of corporate governance for CalSTRs, concurred. “Don’t send me the charter; I can read that for myself,” she pleaded, making a request for only critical information, presented in a concise and accessible form.  As all of us know, too much information can be as bad as too little. Swamp your readers and they’ll find it all too easy to miss your point.

But there is one shortfall that always stands in the way of progress for fresh thinking, and that is lack of imagination. Too few C-suites, committees and other information providers really think about the message they wish to convey, and ways to engage the audience they seek. The best teachers understand that without engagement, there is no education. Information is passed and knowledge is gained through story-telling, entertaining experiences that stick in the mind, and the thoughtful paring down of data and equally thoughtful pumping up of passion, color and context. These are skills and approaches that have value in every area of life, business and governance. They should not be confined to the classroom.

 At NACD’s Director Professionalism® course in Deer Valley, UT last week,

Deer Valley, UT

 our engagement quotient was high: Richard Levick discussed crisis planning at the board level, using the miserable face of an oil-soaked shag and the equally miserable face of former BP CEO Tony Hayward to make his key points; Rob Galford, compensation chair at Forrester Research, used his physical presence and party tricks (“point your finger in the air. Now, on the count of three, point it at the spokesperson in your group”) to drive home some interesting thoughts on performance metrics; and Charles Elson, a director on the board of HealthSouth corporation, used catch phrases (“Don’t be sleazy; Don’t be sloppy”) to help more than 60 directors grasp the essence of the Duty of Loyalty and the Duty of Care.

All of this leads me to an interesting opportunity for washed-up television producers such as myself: We should position ourselves as Chief Engagement Officers for corporations prone to boring their boards to death. We could be creative conduits, taking the dry, dense and dusty and turning it into presentations worthy of prime-time. Similarly, all boards should look for comedians down on their luck, children’s book illustrators with a gift for detail that captivates, and song and dance acts capable of rhyming “audit” with either “plaudit” or “sod it.” Once identified, this rag-tag group should form an Engagement Oversight Committee with advisory status to the board. This EOC would work alongside the GC and reshape anything terminally turgid into a director’s delight. It would solve an unemployment problem in the entertainment sector, and would greatly enhance not only board meetings, but also board, company and stock performance. It might also offer an interesting second career opportunity for burned out teachers…

 If you sleep at night surrounded by spreadsheets and with PowerPoint as your pillow, urge your company to consider this engagement initiative, and soon you’ll look forward to board meetings: We put the “Glee” in governance.

 If you are an NACD member, you can access our Investor Roundtable insights here

To join in the fun at one of NACD’s upcoming courses, click here