Tag Archive: pay ratios

FAQs on the New SEC Pay-Ratio Rule

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On August 5, 2015, the Securities and Exchange Commission released its final pay-ratio rule under the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (hereafter Dodd–Frank). The announcement comes more than five years after Congress passed Dodd–Frank in July 2010 and nearly two years after the SEC first proposed the pay-ratio rule in September 2013. The release describing the new rule is a 294-page document that will be analyzed and applied in the weeks and months to come. Meanwhile, here are some basic FAQs to help boards and compensation committees understand the implications of this much-anticipated development.

  1. What disclosure will the new rule require?

While the release explaining it demands further study, the new rule can be summarized as follows:

  • Companies will be required to disclose the ratio of the median pay of all employees, excluding the “principal executive officer” (in most cases, the CEO), to the total pay of that principal executive officer for the most recently completed fiscal year, as disclosed in that year’s summary compensation table. The calculation for median employee pay can be made for any time during the last three months of the year.

The final rule defines employees as “any U.S. and non-U.S. full-time, part-time, seasonal, or temporary worker (including officers other than the [CEO]) employed by the registrant or any of its subsidiaries as of the last day of the registrant’s last completed fiscal year” (p. 216). Like the proposed rule, the final rule allows statistical sampling and estimates as long as these are “reasonable” (p. 14). Although the word reasonable appears at least 100 times in the release announcing the rule, it is not defined because the SEC believes that “companies would be in the best position to determine what is reasonable in light of their own employee population and access to compensation data.”[1]The ratio would have to appear in any filing that requires executive compensation disclosure, including 10-K annual reports, registration statements, and proxy statements. The SEC final rule specifically mentions the compensation discussion and analysis (CD&A) and the summary compensation table. “In this manner, the pay ratio information will be presented in the same context as other information that shareholders can use in making their voting decisions on executive compensation” (p. 39).

  1. When will the new rule go into effect?

Companies must begin reporting the new data in the first fiscal year beginning on or after January 1, 2017. The pay ratio will appear in the 2018 proxy statement disclosing compensation for 2017. After that, companies will be required to update the disclosure at least once every three years.

  1. To whom will the new rule apply?

The new rule will apply to all U.S. public companies but exempts smaller reporting companies (defined as having a public float of less than $75 million) and emerging growth companies (defined as a having total annual gross revenues of less than $1 billion during their most recently completed fiscal year). It also exempts foreign companies (including Canadian companies listing in the United States) and investment companies (mutual funds). The rule also contains an exemption for U.S.-based global companies that cannot access the median pay data due to foreign data-privacy laws. New public companies would not need to comply with the new rule until their first annual report and proxy statement after they register with the SEC.

  1. What aspects of the rule are likely to raise concerns in boardrooms?

In a comment letter filed on December 1, 2013, NACD expressed concerns that the rule defined the term employees too broadly. We encouraged the SEC to increase the flexibility of the pay-ratio rule by permitting the use of industry averages, by defining employees as full-time U.S. employees, and by permitting supplemental notes to correct any distortions caused by the use of “total pay” figures. The SEC’s final rule does not specifically authorize the use of industry averages, although it appears to permit their use to supplement company-based data. Nor does the final rule exclude part-time workers or foreign workers, allowing an exclusion of only up to 5 percent of a non-U.S. workforce.

In combination, these factors in the final rule may cause the ratio of median employee to CEO pay to appear relatively small in industries that employ part-time or non-U.S. workers. Over time an industry pattern may emerge, but initially there could be a hit to reputation. Boards can start now in preparing for potential impact on company reputation and employee morale.

  1. What do boards and committees need to do in the short term?

First, board members should become familiar with the requirements of the new rule, with help from their compensation committees and their compensation advisor. Then they will be in a position to ask informed questions. Compensation committees can begin by asking their chief human resources officer (CHRO) and chief financial officer (CFO) the following questions:

  • Do we have the information available to calculate the two numbers required for the ratio so that the board can begin its analysis? What technical and definitional issues, if any, may arise in this calculation, and what support might you need to resolve those issues? What is your rough estimate of the cost of calculation (e.g., staff time, data systems requirements, and/or third-party analysis)?
  • Will you work with an external compensation firm or other external consultant (such as a payroll expert) to determine the ratio?
  • Can the external advisor estimate the ratios of peer companies on the basis of publicly available data? What are the pros and cons of having the company’s consultant collaborate with the board’s compensation advisor in calculating such estimates?

Similarly, they might consider asking the following two questions of the independent firm that advises the board on CEO and senior management pay:

  • What information, if any, is currently available on estimated ratios of employee/
    CEO pay for our industry peers so we know where we stand?
  • If you will be working with the company’s external advisor in collecting relevant data and/or preparing estimated ratio information (if one is retained by CHRO/
    CFO), would such activity be perceived as compromising your independence under current SEC rules? If so, how can we proactively counteract such a perception?

Having gained insights from these initial questions, directors might want to consider the following:

  • How comprehensive and compelling are our current published disclosures about our pay philosophy? Have we clearly communicated the link between our strategy, pay plan design, and pay outcomes?
  • Does our pay philosophy include employee pay beyond the executive level? Are there opportunities to address this issue in a more detailed way? For example, does our published pay philosophy specifically discuss the issue of pay distribution patterns and/or “fairness”? If not, is this something we might consider addressing?[2]
  • What information, if any, have we received from surveys regarding employee satisfaction with compensation levels?
  • What feedback, if any, have we received from our major shareholders about our compensation plan and our pay-for-performance track record? If we have heard concerns, what have we done to resolve them?
  • If the early estimated ratio for total pay appears out of proportion to any available estimates for our peers and/or industry, how should we interpret this discrepancy? What would this tell us about the structure of our reward system?
  • What would be the impact of early voluntary disclosure?
  1. What implications might this new rule have for D&O liability?

Any new disclosure rule immediately triggers potential director liability, absent a safe harbor provision. Although shareholder lawsuits against companies are often triggered by weak stock prices, the putative grounds for lawsuits are usually based on alleged disclosure violations, particularly in changes-of-control.[3] For more on D&O litigation, see the May–June 2015 issue of NACD Directorship.

  1. Is the new rule likely to be challenged?

It is possible that trade groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce may try to get the rule vacated by a federal court. In a statement released via e-mail on August 5, David Hirschmann, president of the Chamber’s Center for Capital Markets Competitiveness, stated,We will continue to review the rule and explore our options for how best to clean up the mess it has created.” In the past this type of cleanup has meant legal action. In July 2011, the Chamber joined the Business Roundtable to successfully vacate a proxy access rule under Dodd–Frank that would have mandated a particular form of shareholder access to director nominations via the proxy ballot. Similarly, in April 2014, the National Association of Manufacturers and others succeeded in getting a court to declare an aspect of the conflict minerals rule under Dodd–Frank to be a violation of free speech.

  1. What long-term impact might the new rule have on human capital at corporations?

Compliance with the new rule is important, but the core issue for companies remains the same: developing a pay structure, at all levels of the organization, that is aligned with the firm’s strategy and aimed at long-term value creation. Sustained corporate performance is based in large part on human talent, and compensation is one of the key factors in motivating employees. Furthermore, payroll and benefits represent a significant percentage of capital allocation at many companies. For these reasons, among others, many boards will likely take a greater interest in pay at lower levels, and they will want independent verification of a wider band of pay practices. More broadly, a growing number of boards are stepping up their oversight of management’s talent development activities across the organization. For guidance, directors can turn to the Report of the NACD Blue Ribbon Commission on Talent Development.

  1. What resources does NACD have to help compensation committees cope with this and other current compensation matters?

The following NACD resources may be helpful:

NACD will continue to monitor the pay-ratio disclosure issue and other Dodd–Frank compliance matters as they evolve, providing further guidance and perspective on these and related matters.


[1] “Consistent with the proposal, the final rule does not specify any required methodology for registrants to use in identifying the median employee. Instead, the final rule permits registrants the flexibility to choose a method to identify the median employee based on their own facts and circumstances“ (p. 113). “The proposed rule did not prescribe specific estimation techniques or confidence levels for identifying the median employee because we believed that companies would be in the best position to determine what is reasonable in light of their own employee population and access to compensation data” (p. 98).

[2] Note: “Fairness” was one of the five principles of pay recommended by NACD in the Report of the NACD Blue Ribbon Commission on Executive Compensation (2003), and was also cited in the more recent Report of the NACD Blue Ribbon Commission on the Compensation Committee (2015).

[3] Josh Bradford, D&O Claims Trends: Q2 2015, Advisen Ltd., July 2015.

Discussion Topics for Compensation Committees in 2013

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In 2012, the focus for those both inside and outside the boardroom was compensation. Although numerous rules mandated by Dodd-Frank affecting the compensation committee—say on pay and compensation committee and advisor independence—have been implemented, directors still brace for those to come: pay-for-performance disclosures, clawbacks, and median pay ratios. As such, it is expected that the focus on executive compensation will not shift dramatically in the coming year.

As boards head into proxy season, NACD has recently released a new white paper: Compensation Committee Priorities for 2013. With input from our National Compensation Committee Chair Advisory Council and partners Farient Advisors and Gibson Dunn, this report details the issues that the advisory council—and compensation committees across the nation—will discuss in 2013. The list includes:

  • Executive Compensation and Supplemental Disclosures. In recent years, investors, proxy advisory firms, regulators, and boards have significantly increased the level of attention paid to the compensation discussion and analysis, particularly as the source of whether pay matches performance. This year, the Securities and Exchange Commission is expected to issue proposed rules on Section 953 of Dodd-Frank entitled “Executive Compensation Disclosures.” Section (a) specifically addresses the disclosure of pay versus performance.
  • Realized and Realizable Pay. A significant issue underlies the provision in Section 953(a): a lack of standards surrounding the various terms referenced. Although Dodd-Frank requires that companies disclose “pay actually received” (generally referred to as “realized pay”), many companies choose to disclose “realizable” pay. Not only do companies use a range of definitions to calculate realizable pay, Institutional Shareholder Services has begun to use its own definition when assessing compensation.
  • Peer Group Selection. Selection of peer group continues to be a highly contested and critical action. If a company’s chosen peer group is incorrect in the eyes of shareholders or their advisors, all ensuing calculations based on this selection are incorrect. Furthermore, selections that raise red flags to investors or proxy advisors may lead to negative say-on-pay votes come proxy season.

For the rest of the issues likely to be discussed by compensation committees in 2013 and related resources, download Compensation Committee Priorities for 2013.

Pay Ratios: A Question of When, Not If

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Moving into May and the peak of annual meeting season, executive compensation is one of the top stories in the business media. To date, eight companies have failed their annual say-on-pay votes. With the bulk of annual shareholder meetings in the coming months, this number is expected to increase. This week, an editorial in the New York Times criticized the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for failing to issue rules on another area of executive compensation—pay ratios—claiming the “main problem seems to be foot-dragging in the face of objections from corporate lobbyists.”

The article correctly identifies several factors. The SEC did delay issuing final rules on the CEO pay ratio until the second half of 2012, effectively postponing corporate disclosure of the ratio of chief executive pay to the company’s median salary until the 2013 proxy season. Also, a substantial number of comment letters have already been submitted to the SEC on matters regarding executive compensation disclosures, including some for which there are no rules pending. Lastly, the rules mandated for pay ratios in Dodd-Frank are unlike most other provisions in the legislation, in that Congress did not allow for much flexibility in crafting the final rules.

However, the NYT editorial did not mention several factors that have hindered progress for the SEC. According to the May 2012 Dodd-Frank Progress Report from Davis Polk, of the SEC’s 95 required rulemakings, the agency has missed the deadline for 56. When final rules are actually released, they are often met with criticism and lawsuits. Last summer the U.S. District Court of Appeals overturned the SEC’s proxy access rule on the basis that the agency had not conducted a thorough cost-benefit analysis. The SEC subsequently introduced a more robust economic analysis in its rulemaking process, leading to a missed deadline for releasing a final rule regarding the conflict minerals provision—which will require companies to track and disclose their use of minerals potentially sourced from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

With the rigid mandates on the pay-ratio disclosure, the SEC is facing difficulties with one area not clearly defined: computing median compensation. While Dodd-Frank was explicit in the calculation of the ratio, it was not clear in how the median total compensation would be measured. This measurement leads to several questions: Does the compensation of every employee at an organization need to be computed? Should part-time employees be included in the calculation? Would international employees be included? If so, what foreign exchange rate would be used? Taking these questions into consideration, last August the AFL-CIO proposed the use of statistical sampling to calculate the median compensation, an option the SEC is taking seriously.

The argument is no longer whether pay ratio disclosures will have the intended effect of changing executive compensation. Instead, it is when and how these rules will be issued.