Tag Archive: McDonald’s

Future-Proofing: Planning C-Suite Succession

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Recently, several companies made headlines after facing dramatic leadership changes. In the current environment, it is critical that directors actively ensure their company has developed a robust executive talent management program. However, according to preliminary data from the 2012-2013 NACD Public Company Governance Survey, more than half of respondents (54.7 percent) classify their company’s CEO succession plans as informal: general discussion, but no formal documentation.

As part of NACD’s effort to share key insights and help boards plan for the future, a session of the upcoming NACD Board Leadership Conference is designed to address this very issue. During the panel discussion, three current directors will share their stories, insights and strategies for future-proofing the C-suite. Slated to speak are:

Kathy J. Higgins Victor, director, Best Buy

Last April, Best Buy experienced a significant executive upheaval when former CEO Brian Dunn resigned amid allegations of misconduct. In May, Founder Richard Schulze also stepped down. The board found themselves in a crisis situation, with two key vacancies to fill in a short period of time.

Higgins Victor, a Best Buy director since 1999, proved to be an invaluable asset to the company. With her extensive experience in executive development, succession planning, and leadership coaching, she served as the nominating committee chair during the transition. During the discussion, Higgins Victor will share the lessons she learned as well as expert insights on effective succession planning.

Michele J. Hooper, director, PPG Industries, UnitedHealth Group, NACD board

Hooper serves on the NACD board of directors and on the boards of PPG Industries, Inc. and UnitedHealth Group. She chairs the audit committee for PPG and the nominating and governance committee for UnitedHealth Group. She previously was a board member of Target Corp., AstraZeneca PLC, DaVita Corp., and Seagram Co. Ltd. She is president and CEO of The Directors’ Council, which specializes in corporate board of director recruitment.

Andrew McKenna, chairman, McDonald’s

McDonald’s faced rapid-fire changes in executive leadership in 2004. Six months after Chairman and CEO James Cantalupo’s sudden death, his successor Charles Bell resigned after being diagnosed with a terminal illness. By the time James Skinner was named CEO in December 2004, the company was well-versed in emergency executive succession.

Current McDonald’s chairman McKenna will discuss how the company worked through this challenging period, safeguarding both corporate reputation and shareholder value. He will provide insights on proactive succession planning and how boards might “future-proof” their companies.

We anticipate a candid and instructive dialogue with Higgins Victor, Hooper and McKenna. Don’t miss out on this CEO succession planning session and the many other invaluable discussions at this year’s NACD Board Leadership Conference, Oct.14-16 at the Gaylord National Resort in National Harbor, MD—just minutes from downtown D.C.

NACD Full Board Membership: What It Means for Companies and Investors

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NACD recently announced that more than 40 companies, including several Fortune-ranked corporations, had become NACD Full Board Members, joining 1,000 current NACD Full Board Members. This was yet another example of the commitment corporate directors are making to achieve exemplary board leadership and the highest standards of corporate governance.

“NACD Full Board Members” are exactly what the name suggests: An entire corporation’s board of directors and optional C-suite executives joins NACD, embracing our mission to disseminate and encourage the best professional and ethical boardroom practices. As NACD Full Board Members, these directors and executives can take advantage of myriad resources to better understand and respond to current emerging issues and opportunities.

In today’s world, having the skills to address these issues is more crucial than ever. To that end, some of the great names in business are finding solutions with NACD. Full Board Member companies are a diverse group, including small- and mid-cap public companies and diverse private companies as well as nonprofit organizations. NACD Full Board Members range from Microsoft to PEPSICO, from McDonald’s to Lockheed Martin, and Corning, Panera Bread, The Hershey Co., Foot Locker, ConocoPhillips, Pinnacle West Capital Corp., Warnaco and IDEX Corp. are among the Fortune-ranked companies that recently joined.

What Full Board Membership means for companies:

As an NACD Full Board Member, a company demonstrates—to employees, consumers and investors—its resolute commitment to the highest governance and board leadership standards. NACD provides a wealth of resources to support this quest, as Full Board Members are entitled to exclusive programs, special events, advisory services and board evaluations. NACD custom-designs a number of benefits for board chairmen, lead directors and key committee chairs, and we provide a variety of educational and research resources tailored for individual companies.

What Full Board Membership means for investors:

NACD Full Board Membership is a corporate asset. It designates a public company as one that has taken practical action to maintain the highest standards of professionalism, and to both understand and respond to today’s emerging issues and opportunities. For both current shareholders and potential investors, the message is encouragingly clear. 

NACD Full Board Membership inspires confidence among all stakeholders. Click here to learn more about Full Board Membership, including information on how to join.

Ken Daly Discusses Proposed SEC Whistleblower Regulations

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Last week, in a Benzinga.com article, “Let’s Not Step Backwards with Whistleblowing Provisions,” NACD President and CEO Ken Daly called for a cooling off period for the proposed Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) whistleblower regulations to allow time for more discussions with regulators, shareholders, directors, and executives. These discussions could help create a more effective program.

The article emphasized the fact that more than 260 of the largest U.S. companies, including McDonald’s Corp., Gap Inc., GlaxoSmithKline PLC, and Google, Inc. have spoken out against the new rules. Specifically, these companies believe that the reward for reporting directly to the SEC, potentially in excess of $1 million dollars, will discourage whistleblowers from initially reporting through the internal lines of communication mandated by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

The article lists several other concerns with the proposed whistleblower rules. Many question whether the already strained SEC will be able to handle the expected flood of new whistleblower complaints. Furthermore, the proposed rules do not provide adequate punitive consequences for false allegations. This potential combination increases the probability that the agency will be unable to identify serious reports amidst piles of superfluous claims.

To read the article, visit http://www.benzinga.com/life/politics/11/03/960493/lets-not-step-backwards-with-whistleblowing-provisions.