Tag Archive: Madoff

Hu, Valukas, and Markopolos on Corporate Governance

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As the country emerges from the worst financial downturn since the Great Depression, directors, executives and other corporate governance experts gathered to honor the 100 most influential players in the boardroom and analyze recent mistakes and how they can be avoided at the NACD Directorship 100 Forum held Monday and Tuesday in New York City. The 100 honorees were commended at a dinner Monday night in a keynote address by Henry Hu, director of the SEC’s Division of Risk, Strategy and Financial Innovation.

Hu presented his “decoupling” concept, and explained how it relates to boards’ current challenges, especially as directors face the new Dodd-Frank Act. He pointed to the Act as the “most comprehensive change in generations… representing a new era for corporations and boards that introduces new challenges and new opportunities. It is important to get the balance between corporate governance and financial innovation right.”

The Forum’s second day featured Anton Valukas, court-appointed examiner in the Lehman Brothers’ bankruptcy, explaining the actions that the Lehman board could have taken to better prepare for the company’s failure. While Valukas does not believe that failure was preventable, he did explain that, had the board asked more important questions, the fall would have had less severe of an impact on the U.S. economy.
“In this case,” said Valukas, “one word would have made the difference: transparency.” (read Valukas’ full report here)

Also featured was Harry Markopolos, author of No One Would Listen, which details his ten-year-long investigation of Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, the largest in history.  Markopolos took a firm tone with the directors of the room, imploring them to “use your experts and don’t take numbers from management, for the sake of your shareholders and stakeholders. That’s your job.”

Beware the Whistleblowers

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Judy Warner

Judy Warner

Today guest blogger Judy Warner, managing editor of NACD Directorship, shares her thoughts about the implications of the new whistleblower program and the board’s oversight role in corporate compliance.

Harry Markopolos writes emphatically about the need to compensate corporate whistleblowers in his book, No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller, released  this year by John Wiley & Sons.

The independent fraud investigator feared for his life for nearly a decade as he sought to expose Bernie Madoff’s $65 billion dollar Ponzi scheme to the government, the media—anyone who would listen. That all changed when Madoff confessed to his sons, and, in effect, turned himself in, exposing a financial fraud that resulted in his conviction and the loss of individual fortunes many times over. The Dodd-Frank Act creates a new whistleblower program, with new protections and potentially large cash rewards for individuals, like Markopolos, who provide information about securities law violations to the SEC.

Under the terms of the new law, the Commission will pay a whistleblower between 10 and 30 percent of any monetary sanctions in excess of $1 million dollars that the SEC recovers as a result of the whistleblower’s assistance.

A story by Marcia Coyle in The National Law Journal, published July 19, 2010, on www.law.com, reports that some corporate attorneys see the new program as a bounty and warns that even companies with robust compliance programs face increased risk. “You could have a perfect compliance program and still have no legal defense,” said FCPA specialist Richard Cassin of Cassin Law (www.cassinlaw.com) in Singapore. “We kind of depend on prosecutorial discretion. The Department of Justice (which shares enforcement authority with the SEC) will come down less hard, but still, when companies have employees who go rogue, companies are strictly liable. I don’t like it because I think it’s a disincentive to maintain a good, robust compliance program, and to self-report violations.”

Markopolos will speak specifically about the implications of the new whistleblower program and the board’s oversight role in corporate compliance at the NACD Directorship Forum on November 9 in New York City. To register, visit directorship.com/events.

Judy Warner is managing editor of NACD Directorship, the official magazine of NACD. A journalist for more than 30 years, Warner now manages the creation of all Directorship products, including its magazine, events, website, and newsletters. Warner joined the Directorship team in 2007 from ComAve, LLC, an independent marketing consulting firm she founded and ran for eight years. Warner was formerly the New England bureau chief and editor for Adweek magazine and a senior editor for Marketing Computers. She began her journalism career in the newsroom of The Boston Globe.