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Discussion Topics for Compensation Committees in 2013

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In 2012, the focus for those both inside and outside the boardroom was compensation. Although numerous rules mandated by Dodd-Frank affecting the compensation committee—say on pay and compensation committee and advisor independence—have been implemented, directors still brace for those to come: pay-for-performance disclosures, clawbacks, and median pay ratios. As such, it is expected that the focus on executive compensation will not shift dramatically in the coming year.

As boards head into proxy season, NACD has recently released a new white paper: Compensation Committee Priorities for 2013. With input from our National Compensation Committee Chair Advisory Council and partners Farient Advisors and Gibson Dunn, this report details the issues that the advisory council—and compensation committees across the nation—will discuss in 2013. The list includes:

  • Executive Compensation and Supplemental Disclosures. In recent years, investors, proxy advisory firms, regulators, and boards have significantly increased the level of attention paid to the compensation discussion and analysis, particularly as the source of whether pay matches performance. This year, the Securities and Exchange Commission is expected to issue proposed rules on Section 953 of Dodd-Frank entitled “Executive Compensation Disclosures.” Section (a) specifically addresses the disclosure of pay versus performance.
  • Realized and Realizable Pay. A significant issue underlies the provision in Section 953(a): a lack of standards surrounding the various terms referenced. Although Dodd-Frank requires that companies disclose “pay actually received” (generally referred to as “realized pay”), many companies choose to disclose “realizable” pay. Not only do companies use a range of definitions to calculate realizable pay, Institutional Shareholder Services has begun to use its own definition when assessing compensation.
  • Peer Group Selection. Selection of peer group continues to be a highly contested and critical action. If a company’s chosen peer group is incorrect in the eyes of shareholders or their advisors, all ensuing calculations based on this selection are incorrect. Furthermore, selections that raise red flags to investors or proxy advisors may lead to negative say-on-pay votes come proxy season.

For the rest of the issues likely to be discussed by compensation committees in 2013 and related resources, download Compensation Committee Priorities for 2013.