Tag Archive: External audit

Skepticism Lessons Learned

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I’ve always been a trusting soul. One of my earliest lessons involved me diligently removing debris from a stream for someone in exchange for the official deed to the stream. The problem was, he didn’t own it.

I did not possess the skill of skepticism—defined in Audit Standard (AU) 316 as “an attitude that includes a questioning mind and a critical assessment of … evidence.” If I had, I would have observed that the shiny gold seal I was given was the kind you can buy at Woolworth’s 5 &10, and that the stream ran not only behind the deedor’s property but contiguous ones as well.

Yet there’s hope for us all. On October 1, NACD launched a unique new webinar series on Skepticism as part of an ongoing Anti-Fraud Collaboration with the Center for Audit Quality (CAQ), Financial Executives International (FEI), and The Institute for Internal Auditors (IIA). Along with many at NACD, I was involved in this exciting project, and had a chance to review the upcoming episodes.

“Skepticism” relates to a search for the truth. The term comes from the Greek skeptikos used some 2,300 years ago by disciples of the philosopher Pyrrhos. The verb skeptesthai means “to reflect, look, view.” The earliest self-declared skeptics emphasized the importance of the senses in confirming reality. Over time, the word’s meaning expanded to include the notion of reasonable doubt. Today, the “skeptic” is perceived as a doubter—someone who may trust, but must always verify.

It’s an attitude we all need. And perhaps no one knows this better than series moderator Michele J. Hooper, president and CEO of The Directors’ Council, and board member of NACD and CAQ’s governing board. Through questions and comments based on her considerable experience on a variety of public company boards she brings out the best in the six-part series, outlined as follows:

  1. A brief introduction.
  2. The Etiquette and Ethics of Skepticism with Mary M. Mitchell, president, The Mitchell Group, and Bill White, professor at Northwestern University and experienced director.
  3. Professional Skepticism and the External Auditor with Cindy Fornelli, executive director, CAQ; and Greg Weaver, CEO and chairman, Deloitte & Touche.
  4. Skepticism and the Audit Committee with Marty Coyne, lead director and audit committee member, Akamai Technologies; and Ken Daly, president and CEO, NACD.
  5. Skepticism and the Financial Executive with Marie Hollein, president and CEO, FEI; and Greg Kabureck, chief accounting officer, Xerox Corporation.
  6. Skepticism and the Internal Auditor with Richard Chambers, president and CEO, The IIA; and Paul Sobel, vice president and chief audit executive, Georgia Pacific.

In addition to these webinars, NACD will release a white paper with in-depth background and additional resources on skepticism in December.

Why skepticism? It’s a great way to break the fraud triangle—composed of incentive, opportunity, and rationalization—which can cost businesses so dearly. Financial reporting fraud, the focus of this series, is responsible for a significant percentage of the $3.5 trillion that businesses lose to fraud every year, according to a recent study by the Association for Certified Fraud Examiners.

The value of the labor I devoted to cleaning out that stream for a fake deed may not be worth much in dollars, but whenever trust is violated the cost is too high.

Fraud is unfortunately a fact of life; therefore skepticism is a skill we all need.

NACD Spearheads Alternative Solution to Mandatory Audit Firm Rotation

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Next week, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) will hold its second public hearing on a proposed rule that would mandate audit firm rotation for all publicly traded companies. One concept the PCAOB has floated is a requirement that public companies rotate audit firms at least every 10 years.

The concept has been floated as a way to address flagging investor confidence in the ability of public audit firms to maintain strict independence.  However, the proposal could have an unintended adverse and far-reaching impact on public companies, not only for directors but also for executives, investors and shareholders.

NACD members across the nation are raising concerns about this concept.  In response, NACD is leading an initiative to engage the corporate governance community and propose an alternative solution—one that allows directors to retain their governance authority while also addressing what the PCAOB perceives to be a lack of investor confidence in the processes by which companies ensure auditor independence.

Audit quality and independence are important issues for directors, and reassuring investor and regulator confidence is a worthy goal.  But in our view, mandatory auditor rotation devalues and undermines the important role boards—and audit committees in particular—play in helping auditors maintain independence, objectivity and skepticism.

In our formal comment letter to the PCAOB, NACD expressed concerns about this proposal on behalf of our members and the entire boardroom community.  We objected to a mandated “one-size-fits-all” solution that would detract from the authority of the audit committee, supplant the board’s governance process and possibly generate unintended risk for the company.

The NACD was not alone in raising questions about the concept. The public comment period triggered a record-breaking volume of comment letters to the PCAOB and vigorous discussion at a roundtable in which NACD participated here in Washington last March.  Several roundtable panelists suggested that NACD was a key source to weigh in on board-level solutions, and the PCAOB noted that it would be receptive to our input.

The NACD Audit Committee Chair Advisory Council is spearheading this initiative, building a coalition comprised of investor representatives (including the Council of Institutional Investors) and the audit profession (including the Center for Audit Quality).   This coalition has a dual mission:

  1. Identify and evaluate with the corporate governance community an alternative solution to mandated regulations on auditor rotation.
  2. Promote this solution within the community and advocate its beneficial effects to the PCAOB and other influencers.

Our goal is to provide our recommendations and rationale to the PCAOB no later than December 2012, in anticipation of the PCAOB finalizing its recommendations in early 2013.

We need your input.  As a first step to formulating an alternative solution to mandatory auditor rotation, we are asking our 12,000 members to offer their own insights on how boards—and audit committees in particular—can apply leading practices to build investor and public trust.

Click here to provide your thoughts through a brief electronic survey. Responses are anonymous and will only be reviewed in aggregate form.

Your participation in this initial survey is a first step in shaping a framework for recommendations that will guide audit committee behavior and actions on matters of auditor independence, objectivity and skepticism.  These recommendations will be shared with the director and investor communities over the course of the coming months.

Ultimately, NACD will deliver these recommendations to the PCAOB by the end of the year, and we will position those concepts as representative of the will and the expertise of the public company directors and boards.

At NACD, we are committed to advancing and promoting best practices of companies to ensure proper board oversight that protects shareholders, investors and employees.