Tag Archive: ESG

Experts to Directors: Innovation, Culture Change Starts With You

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There is a buzz in the air about renovating corporate culture in the name of innovation. Directors hear the changing desires of their stakeholders, and are developing a greater understanding of their business’s role for society at large. That buzz guided a recent roundtable discussion in Miami at NACD’s Leading Minds of Governance event.

A panel of governance experts and directors discussed recent trends in corporate governance with a full room of directors (fuller remarks from the panel will follow in the March/April 2018 issue of NACD Directorship magazine). Panelists included:

  • John Borneman, managing director, Semler Brossy Consulting Group LLC
  • Stuart R. Levine, nominating and governance committee chair and audit committee member, Broadridge Financial Solutions
  • Kathleen Misunas, director, Boingo Wireless and Tech Data Corp.; principal, Essential Ideas
  • Michael Stevenson, partner, BDO USA LLP
  • Peter P. Tomczak, partner, Baker McKenzie LLP

Highlights from their answers to select questions from directors in the audience follow. Comments have been edited for length.

To Build an Innovative Culture, Start with Hiring

I work in a heavily regulated industry. We’re in a very steady environment, but our industry is changing rapidly in all directions. Helping shift that culture is essential, so I’d love to hear your differing perspectives.

Misunas: I think it starts with the people you hire—and you need the buy-in from your senior staff. The people that are hired help you move in the right direction.

Levine: One of the criteria for hiring should be intellectual curiosity. If you’re hiring people at any level, including on the board, if those people do not express intellectual curiosity, I think you’ve got a problem on your hands. In the boardroom, consider sharing content that stimulates discussions around technology or governance trends.  By discussing strategic material, it encourages excellent outcomes.

Misunas: Right. This absolutely should cascade down through the organization. The C-suite alone shouldn’t be concerned with curiosity. The next level should be doing the same thing with their staff, and so on.

Tomczak: When you consider innovation strategy, what does innovation mean to your board? Do you mean bringing in new ideas from outside your industry? If you’re hiring the same 20-year industry veterans, you’re probably going to get the same 20-year-old strategy. I’ve also found that tying individual economic incentives to strategy outcomes is useful, and it’s hard. There’s no right answer to the compensation question and innovation.

Borneman: I’ll add that innovation should be on the CEO’s scorecard. Is it one of the top priorities that you want to hold her accountable to for the organization? You can say it’s important, but if it’s not on the scorecard, you’re merely talking about innovation. There’s no accountability. It doesn’t have to be tied to compensation—to put dollars on it gets tough. But we can find innovation measures in some kind of meaningful, quantifiable way.

Stevenson: I think that when some boards assess themselves, when they probe their expertise, they find that because of the complexity of transactions (for example, in financial instruments and other changes associated with this current business environment), audit committees are finding themselves ill-equipped to handle changes happening in their organizations. As you take a fresh look at your board, understand the other situations that they have been involved with will arm them for change. That’s a critical point to know about members of this committee. Boards that are refreshing [their composition] with this understanding are also the easiest to work with from an audit perspective.

Don’t Miss the ESG Bus

How do we translate ESG into something with real business meaning that management can be held accountable for to deliver results?

Levine: Approaching the governance standpoint, regardless of the business you’re in, we’re all trying to anticipate client and customer needs. If you don’t have people of diverse backgrounds on your board, you risk not understanding the people who are buying your products and services. If you’re looking to deploy capital, and you look around and don’t have representatives on your board of the populations you’re serving, I don’t know how you develop the right strategy.

Misunas: I don’t walk into a business anymore where this is not a topic of conversation. Boards and executives are peeling back the onion to see where their companies stand, and where they should be, on environmental issues. ESG is top of mind for millennials. They speak up about real environmental issues. As a result, companies can look at their distribution lines, for instance. What are our transportation means? What are those contracted companies doing to protect the environment? Could we switch out business partners for a company that is more responsive to these issues?

If there’s no penalty for not doing anything, you’re omitting ESG from culture. I’m not saying you should give an extra reward for doing something, but should there not be some penalty other than getting left off the bus?

Borneman: The penalty is the impact on your business, your employee population, and getting kicked off the bus. It’s not about your bonus. It’s not about compensation. It’s about a longer perspective on business.

Looking to read more expert insights? Read the current issue of NACD Directorship magazine.

Sustainability and Social Responsibility: Considerations and Tools for Boards

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Ashley Marchand Orme

Learning how to implement sustainable business practices can be challenging for companies in any industry, and boards may wonder how to integrate sustainability issues into discussions with management. NACD has compiled a set of resources offering practical information to help boards discuss climate-related risks, as well as opportunities associated with environmentally- and socially-sustainable business practices.

The first step is to assess why sustainability and social responsibility are such hot topics for the boardroom. Two important factors to consider are the political environment and shareholder expectations.

Signals From the Current Administration

President Donald J. Trump in June announced that the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement, an international deal in which 191 countries have pledged to work toward goals to restrict the increase in temperatures globally to less than 2.0°C and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases being created.

The president in April also signed an executive order aimed at “promoting energy independence and economic growth,” curtailing federal environmental regulations. The order instructs the Department of the Interior to lift former President Obama’s ban on coal leasing activities on federal land.

Watchdog group Environmental Integrity Project recently reported that this year, the Trump administration, when compared to the prior three presidential administrations in the same period, has collected approximately 60 percent less in fines from companies’ violations of pollution-control regulations.

Opposing Pressure From Shareholders

Despite strong signals from the current administration that enforcement of environmental-related regulations will decrease over time, shareholders are applying an opposing pressure on corporations.

More than half (56%) of shareholder proposals introduced this year on proxy ballots related to social, environmental, or policy issues, and Proxy Monitor reports that this proportion is the highest it has seen since it began tracking such data in 2006.

Shareholder proposals relating to environmental and social issues 10 years ago sought fairly basic changes such as increased clarity into companies’ environmental policies. The proposals now seek, for example, enhanced disclosures around what the company is doing to manage climate risks and how executive pay links to sustainability initiatives, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Proposals about environmental issues received a record breaking average of 27 percent support this year, according to Proxy Monitor. That percentage was 21 percent last year and fell in the teens before that.

Meanwhile, State Street Corp., a global financial services and investment management firm with $2.47 trillion in assets under management, published a report earlier this year in which they found that traditional obstacles (like the lack of quality data about ESG) to investing more heavily in companies that prioritize ESG initiative are diminishing.

“Over the long-term, environmental, social and corporate governance issues can have a material impact on a company’s ability to generate returns,” Ron O’Hanley, president and CEO of State Street Global Advisors, said in a press release.

NACD’s Responses

Given the increasing expectations of shareholders and NACD’s continued focus on long-term value creation—a focus that requires a sustainability-focused mindset—NACD has curated its Resource Center: Sustainability and Social Responsibility.

Resource centers are repositories for NACD content, services, and events related to top-of-mind issues for directors. In these resource centers, individuals can find practical guidance, tools, and analyses on subjects varying from board diversity to cyber-risk oversight. Below we have highlighted a sample of helpful materials from our new resource center on sustainability and social responsibility.

Thought Leadership & Research

The resource center features a handbook called Oversight of Corporate Sustainability Activities—part of the NACD Director’s Handbook Series—that offers guidance aimed at strengthening the board’s oversight of sustainability issues.

The handbook, produced in conjunction with EY, centers around four key recommendations:

  • Directors should understand the company’s definition of sustainability in the context of the company’s strategy and specific circumstances.
  • The board and management should align on the sustainability message and information the company chooses to report publicly.
  • Boards should clarify roles for oversight responsibility for sustainability activities, including external reporting.
  • Directors need to establish parameters for sustainability reporting to the board regarding the information required to support robust discussions with management.

Expert Commentary

A number of items included in the resource center provide expert commentary on myriad issues related to sustainability and social responsibility. A favorite of mine is “Living in a Material World,” an article written by Veena Ramani, program director of the Capital Markets Systems, at sustainability-focused nonprofit Ceres.

Ramani discusses the corporate director’s critical role in engaging with management over which sustainability issues are material for the enterprise. She offers four suggestions for board members who want to address the materiality of certain sustainability risks.

Boardroom Tools & Templates

The resource center houses several tools and templates to assist directors as they oversee sustainability-related risks and opportunities. One such tool is the “Self-Assessment: Is Your Board Sustainability-Ready?” evaluation. Directors can answer a set of questions to gauge their board’s level of engagement—or lack thereof—in sustainability oversight.

Videos and Webinars

The NACD BoardVision—Sustainability Oversight video in the resource center features a candid discussion by EY subject matter experts Brendan LeBlanc and Kellie Huennekens on how investors are engaging with boards around sustainability and social responsibility issues. (A transcript of the video is also available here.)

Conclusion

Our hope is that you find this resource center useful and visit it often. We will continue to update it regularly with new and interesting content. If you would like help finding resources on a specific subject matter, please let us know. We welcome the opportunity to engage with directors on pressing needs and concerns.

Five Ways to Improve Your Board’s Oversight of ESG in 2017

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BoardOversightESG

Click to download this complimentary publication.

The National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) recently released its sixth annual edition of Governance Challenges 2017: Board Oversight of ESG, produced in collaboration with NACD’s five strategic content partners: Heidrick & Struggles, the KPMG Board Leadership Center, Marsh & McLennan Companies, Pearl Meyer, and Sidley Austin LLP. Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues encompass a variety of areas in which shareholders have demonstrated an increasing interest: sustainability, diversity and inclusion, human rights, labor practices, executive compensation, employee relations, and board independence.

According to Institutional Shareholder Services, a record number of shareholder resolutions on climate change were filed in 2016, and the average shareholder support for environmental proposals in general has increased dramatically over the last decade—from receiving an average of 11 percent of the vote in 2006 to 21 percent of the vote by June 2016. Shareholder proposals for the 2017 proxy season are also expected to focus on social issues, as there will likely be a regulatory downshift in these areas under the Trump administration.

Drawing from NACD’s report, here are five ways boards can improve ESG oversight this year in response to growing expectations from investors and consumers in this area.

1. Integrate ESG initiatives into company strategy.

How companies consider ESG issues and link them to financial and operational performance demonstrates the company’s approach to creating sustainable, long-term value for investors. KPMG recommends boards set the context for the company’s discussion around ESG issues by asking how they are applicable to the company, customers, employees, and investors. Specifically determine how environmental sustainability can support the company’s financial future. What are the board’s expectations regarding ESG? Will the company broadly address environmental and social issues, or will the company only focus on areas that directly relate to its strategy and operations?

2. Ensure key functional leaders proactively apply ESG in business operations.

All leaders in the C-suite should understand the importance of ESG and how it impacts their functional responsibilities, according to Heidrick & Struggles. For example, does the CFO include ESG elements when conducting financial analysis? Does the CMO clearly demonstrate how the company is committed to ESG goals instead of resorting to greenwashing (i.e., dedicating more effort to claiming to be environmentally responsible than actually doing it)? The board may also consider adding director ESG expertise should the company be recovering from a company-caused environmental disaster or missed opportunities in the marketplace due to lack of attention to ESG.

3. Use executive compensation to support ESG goals.

While many public companies are already engaging on ESG issues, Pearl Meyer research indicates companies fall on a spectrum from conducting basic reporting on ESG to fully integrating ESG into company strategy, culture, and executive compensation plans.

ESGContinuum

Click image to enlarge in a new window.

Alcoa and Exelon are two examples of companies that have linked ESG goals such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction to executive compensation. At Alcoa, “20 percent of executive cash compensation is tied to safety, environmental stewardship (including GHG reductions and energy efficiency), and diversity goals.” Exelon rewards executives for “meeting non-financial performance goals, including safety targets, GHG emissions reduction targets, and goals engaging stakeholders to help shape the company’s public policy positions.”

To link ESG to financial results, boards can consider the following questions regarding compensation:

  • Which components of ESG should we link to our business strategy?
  • How do these ESG factors affect our short-term earnings versus long-term value creation?
  • What are the leading and lagging metrics that matter, incorporating both financial and nonfinancial metrics?

4. Improve disclosure on the impact of climate change.

The Financial Stability Board’s (FSB) Task Force on Climate-related Disclosures (TCFD) is an organization initiated by the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors that has produced recommendations for disclosing climate-related risks and opportunities. The task force recommends that directors consider the following, as summarized by Marsh & McLennan Companies, to promote better disclosure:

  • Processes and frequency by which the board and/or board committees (such as audit, risk, or other committees) are informed about climate-related issues
  • Whether the board and/or board committees consider climate-related issues when reviewing and guiding strategy, major plans of action, risk-management policies, annual budgets, and business plans, as well as when they are setting the organization’s performance objectives, monitoring implementation and performance, and overseeing major capital expenditures, acquisitions, and divestitures
  • How the board monitors and oversees progress against goals and targets for addressing climate-related issues

See the Recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures for additional guidance.

5. Engage shareholders on ESG issues.

According to Sidley Austin LLP, it has now become the norm for investors to consider environmental and social issues when making investment and voting decisions. Boards should determine who from the board and management will engage investors on these issues. These representatives may vary based on the severity of the topic to be discussed and which shareholder the discussion is with. Tracking shareholder voting records, and analyzing which types of proposals are seeing increased traction over time, will also provide insight into the minds of investors.

For more on how your board can improve ESG oversight, download your free copy of Governance Challenges 2017: Board Oversight of ESG. For NACD members, also see NACD’s handbook on Oversight of Corporate Sustainability Activities.