Tag Archive: economic risk

Preparing an Organization for an Economic Downturn

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Jim DeLoach

Jim DeLoach

There is no better time to prepare for an economic downturn than when times are good. With the memory of the severity of the 2007–2008 financial crisis still fresh in the minds of many directors and executives, how should companies prepare for a downturn in the cool of the day, rather than reacting in crisis mode?

Most business plans do not currently anticipate economic downturns; however, a contingency plan makes good business sense because it positions companies to act decisively when recessionary storm clouds loom on the horizon.

Organizations develop contingency plans to address market opportunities should they arise and document specific action steps that are triggered if certain events occur. Such events might include natural disasters, cybersecurity breaches, terrorist attacks, fire, fraud, theft, or embezzlement. These perils may never occur, but the plan nonetheless stands ready with a response team organized to implement it.

The focus of this discussion is how to prepare for an economic recession that causes revenues to decline below a predefined threshold. It is virtually irrefutable that a recession will occur, which is why it’s wise to create a contingency plan to (a) mitigate the financial impact of a severe economic downturn on earnings and share price and (b) position the company to gain market share during the recovery.

In preparing a contingency plan to accomplish these two objectives, action steps are sequenced, prioritized, and grouped by corporate function and operating unit so that ownership of each step is clear. Targeted cost savings in the current and subsequent projection years should also accompany each action step. Key plan elements for most companies include.

  • Headcount and hiring changes. Distressed operating environments present a time for shepherding the talent most critical to retain. Focused retention, objectively determined workforce reductions, and changing hiring practices are often important components of a contingency plan.
  • Compensation, benefit, and incentive plan adjust­ments. Temporary revisions to compensation, benefit, and incentive plans may be necessary to stabilize the firm’s financial condition. Vetting the economic realities of a declining top line and the need for adjustments to the reward system with key personnel before a downturn creates a broader support base for the plan when it is implemented.
  • Asset divestitures. Manage­ment should categorize the company’s assets—underperforming versus high-performing, strategic versus nonstrategic—so that a plan can be developed for each asset category. The plan should consider the timing and the immediate and long-term financial impact of asset sales, and the need for such sales as signs of extreme economic scenarios appear. Timing can be a critical factor due to the difficulty of selling assets in a depressed market. Sale-leaseback transactions for certain facilities are also an option for raising capital.
  • Selling, general and administrative (SG&A) expense cutbacks. SG&A offers many cost reduction opportunities. In the context of a contingency plan, the objec­tive is to adjust the cost structure to support stabilization and preservation of the enterprise.
  • Consider other options. Other steps a company can take include:
    • Hedge raw material costs and lock in sales prices, thereby stabilizing margins — at least for a time;
    • Consider outsourcing non-core activities that are not strategic to the business, if it will reduce costs such as certain human resources support, accounting, manufacturing and transportation activities;
    • Focus marketing on sustaining brand awareness during a recession;
    • Discontinue underperforming operations; and
    • Address the impact of upstream and downstream interconnectivity within the value chain, e.g., what steps would the company take if a major supplier were to go under due to the downturn?
  • Hierarchy for cost-savings initiatives. Management should outline a comprehensive menu of prioritized cost-savings initiatives that could be implemented either in part or in its entirety, depending on the severity of the downturn.
  • Communications plan. In times of economic uncertainty, timely and open communications are vital to preserving morale so that employees know where they stand, and how they and the organization can get through the crisis. Straight talk and transparency are important because, from an employee perspective, no news does not necessarily mean good news.

An effective plan should determine the metrics to be managed against the enterprise’s specified targets such as net operating income percentage, gross margin percentage, acceptable variance from budget, earnings per share, minimum cash reserves, and maximum debt levels. With targets identified, a financial forecast over an appropriate period should be prepared to establish a baseline. Considering different scenarios—revenue declines of, say, 10 and 20 percent— the costs and expected benefits from the various elements mentioned above should be considered to ascertain specific actions management should take under the circumstances.

Once completed, the plan should be reviewed with and approved by the board. The company then resumes its growth strategy with full knowledge that the contingency plan is ready when the time comes—and, unfortunately, it will come. A vetted, actionable contingency plan saves precious time during a crisis because there is a broader base of support for its execution. Preparedness leads to decisiveness under fire.

Management should review the plan on a regular basis to ensure it remains current and apprise the board of any significant changes made to the plan. Going forward, management should monitor the external and internal economic indicators appropriate to the company, and periodically review the analysis with the board. Once the plan is initiated, a project management office should be designated to drive its imple­mentation. The project management office monitors the achievement of the assigned initiatives and provides status reports to senior executives and the board.

Developing a response plan under sunny skies rather than when the recessionary storm breaks  would demonstrate a board’s due care and sound business judgment in discharging its oversight respon­sibilities to address a credible threat. Further, entering a distressed operating environment without a thoughtful, compre­hensive plan can lead to hasty decisions, inefficiencies and costly delays. An organization’s stakeholders deserve better.

Directors Assess Long-Term Election Implications

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This is the second post in a series addressing the short- and long-term impacts of the 2016 presidential election. Read the first post here.

Directors gathered to discuss the impact of the recent presidential election on November 16, 2016 with audit and risk professionals from accounting firm EisnerAmper. While immediate-term changes were pressing on the minds of directors, they also discussed strategies to address societal and business challenges that coalesced around the following topics.

Can Corporations Bring Back Modern Manufacturing Jobs?

Directors were skeptical that the type of manufacturing jobs that have fueled American economic growth since the end of the second World War would ever return—and asserted that changes in trade agreements may directly impact the ability to create jobs.

peter-bible

Peter Bible

EisnerAmper Chief Risk Officer Peter Bible outlined how the developing administration of President-elect Donald Trump could affect the ability of American companies to export their goods. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) “is basically on hold now” said Bible. “He wants tariffs on China and Mexico, wants to renegotiate NAFTA, and reconsider the U.S.’s involvement in international trade agreement.” Bible also pointed out that the president can act unilaterally on trade agreements, thus negating congressional checks on trade decisions.

Jill Wittels, chair at eMagin Corp., voiced concern about the pace at which companies could replace factories to offset the impact of tariffs and build more jobs for Americans. “Imposing currency restrictions and tariffs on goods coming in from China, South America, or other parts of Asia would be highly disruptive,” Wittels said. “You don’t instantly create replacement factories in the U.S. at a comparable cost.”

robert-klatell

Robert Klatell

Robert Klatell, chair of TTM Technologies, concurred. “Realistically speaking, there is not that much flexibility. We cannot create in the United States the scale of manufacturing that exists in China,” Klatell said. “We don’t have the people or the capital to do it. We’ve rarely had a government willing to support manufacturing the same way that China has in the past 10 to 15 years.”

William Leidsdorf, director at Icahn Enterprises, offered a different viewpoint. “I think you have to look at how Congress may change or water down the president’s decisions,” Leidsdorf said. Trump “is a businessman. He’s a pretty good negotiator. He’s going to go in [to the presidency] and say he’ll do a lot of things and then negotiate.”

Educating the Workforce

Re-educating the American workforce has been a ubiquitous topic at roundtables co-hosted by NACD throughout 2016. This event was no exception.

sharon-manewitz

Sharon Manewitz

A vigorous discussion about the modern workforce was ignited when Carol Robbins, principal of financial services strategic advisory group CER Consulting, cited the invention of a garment-sewing robot as a groundbreaking technology likely to replace countless garment manufacturing workers around the world. Sharon Manewitz, principal and executive director at Manewitz Weiker Associates, a firm that consults with struggling companies, responded: “But who will make the robots? Will they be made here? We need corporate America to help educational institutions change the nature of education in America” to meet the demands of a knowledge-based economy.

The ability of the workforce to be retrained for modern jobs, and how automation will continue to disappear unskilled and lower-skilled positions, was discussed at length. Klatell, however, looked to the future. “Some people won’t make the transition, so we should be focusing on their children,” Klatell argued. “Hopefully, we can get their kids through school with a more meaningful education to make them more employable.”

Laurie Shahon, president of Wilton Capital Group, placed a board lens on some companies’ struggle to fill open positions in certain fields. “Human capital is an issue boards have to deal with,” Shahon said. “We see jobs available in financial services and other industries, but they can’t be filled because there aren’t sufficient qualified people to fill them. The board can and should present alternate cases in its strategy planning to address these changes.”

Deregulation Fallout

If Trump makes good on his campaign promises, deregulation is expected under the new administration and the forthcoming Republican majority congress. How long, though, can directors anticipate deregulated policies to last? Bible pointed out that the current administration might attempt to press through lingering Dodd-Frank provisions. However, he warned that deregulation could cause disruption. “These things are deeply rooted, with a lot of capital behind them,” Bible said. “You can’t just say ‘poof—gone.’ It’s impossible.” Practices that companies have implemented as a result of post-financial crisis legislation [such as the Dodd-Frank Act of 2012] are likely not to disappear as governance best practices because companies invested time, energy, and money to comply with them.

Meanwhile, directors in the room considered what impact deregulation might have on enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and other international business policies by the Department of Justice. Andrea Bonime-Blanc, founder of GEC Risk Advisory, reminded attendees that enforcement of the FCPA, the False Claims Act, and other laws has been on the rise lately. “People are asking, ‘What’s going to happen with FCPA enforcement?’” Bonime-Blanc asked. “Companies can’t just say ‘oh, let’s stop worrying about bribery.’”

Bible responded: “I believe that the FCPA will continue to be enforced as a worldwide standard, and that the new administration’s focus is going to be on executive compensation and on market regulation. I don’t think there will be an increase or a decrease in enforcement.” If anything, Bible indicated that directors should be concerned about the risk of tax repatriation from companies that have moved their headquarters offshore. “Is everyone familiar with how the overseas tax issue works?” Bible asked. “There is $2.6 trillion in money offshore, and $500 billion of that is held by tech companies. There are drives to get that money back into the U.S. economy that can be done without addressing the entire tax structure.”

Don’t Give Up on Culture of Inclusion

The social unrest incited or revealed by the vitriolic presidential election was discussed in the context of the culture of inclusion and tolerance that their companies have invested in building for decades. Aside of the moral imperative felt by many attendees, the disruption of hard-won corporate culture by internal or external actors could present a reputation risk to the company.

Wittels noted that a popular American shoe company had been endorsed by an incendiary website littered with forms of hate speech after a senior manager at the shoe company stated that it felt the country was moving in the right direction under the incoming president. While the company released statements strongly stating its commitment to principles of inclusion, “there are comments about boycott,” Wittels said. “This is a real reputational risk, and a risk with consumers, that could instantly in this communication age go viral and affect the bottom line.”

Klatell returned to the question of the board’s responsibility to ensure that the CEO, his direct reports, and management across the organization are responsible for maintaining a culture of respect, dignity, and inclusion. In the face of employees who may be looking to throw principles of inclusion out of the door, Klatell said: “I’d hope that most companies would stand up and say ‘No, this is what we stand for, and this is how we behave.’”

To see the full list of participants, please click here

Experts Provide Guidance to Directors in Light of Brexit

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kimberlysimpson

Kimberly Simpson

The NACD Atlanta Chapter recently hosted an expert panel to discuss what directors should know and, more importantly, what they should be asking of management about the impact of Brexit on their corporations. The panel was moderated by Ambassador Charles Shapiro—former US ambassador to Venezuela and current president of the World Affairs Council of Atlanta—and featured Jeremy Pilmore-Bedford, consul general from the British Consulate-General in Atlanta; Mary Shelton Rose, PwC East Region advisory leader and leader of PwC’s US Brexit Response Office; and Lynn Clarke, CEO of MetroKitchen.com and director for ABARTA, Inc., Kahiki Foods, Inc., Visii.com, and the NACD Atlanta Chapter.

The takeaways from the event fell into three categories.

Takeaway 1: The Brexit outcome is uncertain, but a more moderate outcome is likely to prevail in the European Union.

To assist directors as they consider how to approach discussions about Brexit, the panel highlighted possible outcomes of the Brexit vote. Clearly, the path that would leave the least uncertainty is the one under which Britain retains access to the European single market through a series of bilateral agreements. However, a model where Britain does not continue to benefit from any part of the single market is also possible. Since the panel met, a UK court ruled that the British government requires parliamentary approval to trigger the process of exiting the European Union (EU), which adds additional complexity and uncertainty to the situation, and could give pro-EU lawmakers more opportunity to influence the direction of the exit.

While some may believe that other EU countries may want to punish the UK for Brexit by offering unfavorable trading terms, the panel seemed to agree that cooler heads will likely prevail as EU member countries focus on Britain’s role as a significant trading partner for the EU. According to Pilmore-Bedford, an upside of Brexit that is often overlooked is that Britain could begin to negotiate its own free-trade deals beyond Europe with growing countries like India.

Takeaway 2: The UK is trying to mitigate uncertainty.

Britain is attempting to mitigate some of the uncertainty about possible outcomes through outreach to companies. For example, British Prime Minister Theresa May recently met with top executives from such companies as Amazon, Goldman Sachs, IBM, and Morgan Stanley in an attempt to reassure investors.

UK officials like Pilmore-Bedford are quick to remind companies that the free movement of labor between Britain and the EU will continue until 2019 at a minimum. Also, the British government is working to enact laws that enhance legal stability for businesses. Still, with no crystal ball in hand and uncertainty even among those closest to the situation, the panel made clear that directors and management must remain vigilant.

Takeaway 3: Directors must exercise due diligence now.

Panelist Lynn Clarke showed the audience a jar of Marmite, a much-loved Unilever product in the UK. She cited an example of how, in the current climate in the UK, otherwise routine operational decisions can have significant impacts on a company’s reputation and bottom line. In the case of Marmite, Unilever decided to raise the price of Marmite in the UK, ostensibly to compensate for the sharp drop in the pound’s value following the Brexit vote. Behemoth grocery chain Tesco reacted by removing the product from its website. Analysts and consumers criticized the price hike, particularly since Marmite does not contain ingredients from outside of the UK. Clarke suggested that companies must exercise additional caution in how business is approached in the UK during this tumultuous time.

In addition, directors may pose a number of questions to management to prepare for Brexit’s impact, depending on the type of operations the company has in Europe:

  • Strategic Planning: Have we included flexibility in our planning to allow the company to react to scenarios as they unfold?
  • Investment: Do we want to consider either moving forward with investments or holding off on investments related to UK operations or acquisitions?
    • Clarke, on the board of a UK tech start-up, noted that start-ups in the UK may move to the EU to access existing seed-funding programs.
  • Pricing and Margins: Will we be affected by margin compression from goods sold to/from the UK? Should we modify our prices?
  • Talent: Have we assessed the likely impact of Brexit on talent sourcing to and from the UK should migration be restricted?
  • Supply Chain: How well do we understand our suppliers’ financial positions? Do we know which of our critical suppliers are most vulnerable to price fluctuations?
  • Investors: How will we communicate the financial and strategic effects of Brexit and how we plan to mitigate them to investors?
  • Pension Plans: Will there be concern about pension plans (underfunding, for example, due to asset devaluation)?
  • Technology: How will all of the above affect technology/systems as changes are needed to HR systems, VAT systems, regulatory systems, etc.?

PwC expert Mary Rose Shelton emphasized that preparing for Brexit will give directors the opportunity to explore less emphasized areas of the company such as the supply chain, human resources outside of the US, and European and other overseas operations. Given that the greatest certainty at this point is that uncertainty will reign for some time to come, smart directors will begin asking the right questions now, helping their companies adapt to conditions as they evolve. Please reference NACD’s recent publication The Board’s Role in Brexit Oversight for additional questions boards can consider in response to Brexit.


Kimberly Simpson is NACD’s first regional director, providing strategic support to NACD chapters in the Capital Area, Atlanta, Florida, the Carolinas, and the Research Triangle. Simpson, a former general counsel, was a U.S. Marshall Memorial Fellow to Europe in 2005.