Tag Archive: disruptive innovation

What Happened in Vegas: Highlights from CES

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As part of the National Association of Corporate Directors’ (NACD) continuing mission to help directors understand disruptive technologies and trends, I joined more than 175,000 attendees at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. My team was doing a little reconnaissance work on your behalf. NACD will host a director-focused, member-exclusive Technology Symposium this July, and we wanted to get an advanced look at the most pressing governance implications of new technology. 

After three days of experiencing more than 3,800 vendors, you start to see past the shine of the latest gadgets and understand how the technology that underpins these products is poised to change the world. How those technologies are leveraged by companies is key to understanding the future of disruption, and as we discussed at last year’s Global Board Leaders’ Summit, convergence is the order of the day.

Voice and Motion-Enabled Artificial Intelligence (AI) Are Here to Stay

Whirlpool

A booth showcased one of many partnerships between Amazon and consumer products companies, including Whirlpool.

From controlling the radio volume with a wave of your hand to voice-controlled appliances, AI was everywhere. In fact, the most talked-about company at CES this year didn’t even have a booth. The Amazon logo appeared on products ranging from innovations by Whirlpool to debuting devices from smaller start-ups.

Why? Alexa, Amazon’s AI assistant, was ubiquitous on the show floor.

Alexa is leading the way in enhancing consumer products that implement voice-enabled technology. It is anticipated that Alexa will soon be programmed to power and interact with everything from your toaster to your Toyota.

It became apparent at CES that the future of voice-enabled AI is a person’s ability to speak naturally and rely on the computer to accurately transcribe information. This has significant impact for everyone from office workers to doctors who could rely on the technology to dictate notes to medical records.

John Hotta, a director in the healthcare space and NACD Board Leadership Fellow, was also on hand at CES. “Innovations in voice-activated technology also have huge implications for products, services, and the nature of work, as smart speakerphones or personal assistants such as Google Home or Amazon Dot replace direct user interface with a computer,” Hotta said.

Computer, You Can Drive My Car

CES exhibitors demonstrated the growing sophistication of autonomous vehicle technology. Last year Ford Motor Company CEO Mark Fields promised to turn the automaker from a car company to a mobility company. That strategy was on full display as Ford partnered with San Francisco-based start-up Chariot to show off one of its autonomous mini-buses, a vehicle that Ford hopes will “reinvent mass transit for commuters, companies, and fun-seekers with reliable and affordable service.”

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A wealth of connected, autonomous vehicles were on display.

Autonomous vehicles also buzzed high above the heads of CES attendees. As drone technology continues to evolve for both commercial and industrial use, autonomous vehicle technology is being applied to those vehicles as well. In a convergence of these trends, Mercedes exhibited a fully autonomous delivery vehicle equipped with two roof-mounted drones that facilitate package delivery from the van to the doorstep.

Another trend emerged at CES: the use of autonomous vehicles as a tool for vehicle safety. Thanks to the convergence of AI and the Internet of Things (IoT), vehicle-to-vehicle technology has enabled cars to talk to their passengers and to other vehicles on the road. As attendees at the 2016 NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit may remember, Chris Gerdes, head of innovation at the Department of the Transportation (DOT), discussed how DOT is piloting this technology in cities across the U.S. to slash traffic fatalities, and nearly every major automaker is now getting in on the act. Hyundai and Cisco announced a partnership to leverage IoT technology to improve safety and improve congestion by connecting vehicles to municipal infrastructure.

Governance Implications

Collaboration is Key

Logos

Consumer products and technology companies are forging essential partnerships.

As technology becomes more ubiquitous and innovation becomes decentralized, companies are realizing they can’t go it alone. Consumer products companies are linking up with leading technology companies to build resilience to innovation. In addition to the proliferation of Alexa-linked products, Honda Motor Co. has teamed up with VISA to enable vehicle-based mobile payment systems that allow passengers to conduct transactions without leaving their cars. Apparel companies like Tory Burch and Fossil—companies that seem more at home at New York Fashion Week than at CES—also had large booths touting their new lines of wearables. And finally, in-house labs at big brands like Whirlpool are partnering with crowd-funding platforms like IndieGogo to launch new products. Like the auto companies profiled above, this is another example of convergence that directors would be wise to anticipate.

Private Eyes Are Watching You

The act of welcoming devices into our workplaces and homes that listen and watch our every move could revolutionize the way we live and work—and opens us to unprecedented privacy and security concerns. Coupled with a proliferation of smart products aimed specifically at tweens and children, smart devices present a whole host of liability issues that technology, legal, and regulatory experts are just starting to grapple with.

Amazon’s Alexa and Mattel have already made news for the unintended consequences of giving children access to this kind of technology. Additionally, U.S. courts are considering the legal implications of using recordings from these devices as evidence. One such case pits Amazon against prosecutors in who believe that data from an Amazon Echo might be key in solving a murder case.

In this rapidly evolving climate, directors should be asking questions about whether or not security is being integrated into product development now and in the future—from research and development, to plant upgrades, to policies that allow employees to use their own smart devices for work.

The Future of the Workforce

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and a 2016 NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit speaker, recently said, “Technology will surely create jobs. But virtually none of the people displaced will have the training for them.” The changing nature of the global economy threatens to make some American jobs obsolete. If CES made one point clear, it’s that the current concern over the decline in manufacturing and coal jobs pales in comparison to the potential changes that will come with widespread automation of jobs.

Car

Volkswagen exhibits its electric, autonomous I.D. concept car.

Remember the self-driving delivery van with the automated drones that deliver packages mentioned above? Think about that technology and then look at this interactive map of the top jobs by state. Last August, Uber Technologies acquired Otto, a self-driving truck company, further showing how 1.7 million middle-class jobs could disappear in short order. The American economy is facing a potential employment crisis the likes of which may be unprecedented.

It’s not just delivery drivers who are in danger. As Jane Fraser, CEO of Citigroup’s Latin America business said at Fortune magazine’s Most Powerful Women Summit in October, “we are expecting 500 billion objects to become connected to the internet and this automation is going to hollow out middle and working class jobs.”

This shift has huge implications for the American economy and its ability to compete on a global scale. Consider, for instance, that automated delivery of packages is only helpful if your company has a customer base that can afford to spend money on products. A recent report by the President’s Council of Economic Advisers lays out the dual challenges of educating a workforce that is ready for the jobs of the future, and the uphill battle of transitioning to an AI-based economy. This report is great reading for directors as they consider the role of the corporation in society, and could help the board shape individual company strategy in critical areas like innovation, talent development, and long-term value creation.

You can see, hear, and learn more about these trends at the 2017 Global Board Leader’s Summit. Stay tuned for information about our new director-focused, curated tour of the 2018 CES show next January.

Experience the Technologies Changing Our Future

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At NACD’s Master Class this August, directors from companies like Boingo Wireless Inc., Colgate-Palmolive Co., Kimberly-Clark Corp., GameStop Corp., and the Royal Bank of Canada convened in Laguna Beach, California, for peer-to-peer discussions on strategy, risk, and leading through disruption. One common thread ran throughout the discussions: companies expend enormous resources and efforts to mitigate cyber, geopolitical, and other threats, but they have yet to allocate the same attention to technology disruption. Kelvin Westbrook— president and CEO of KRW Advisors LLC, and a director of Archer Daniels Midland Co., Stifel Financial Corp., and T-Mobile US Inc.—framed the issue this way for Master Class participants: “Companies can survive cyber data breaches, but many don’t survive innovative technology disruption. It’s a bigger deal that we need to address.”

InnovationNationHand

A prosthetic hand created using low-cost 3-D printing technology was demonstrated at the 2015 Global Board Leaders’ Summit. Photo by Denny Henry.

This year’s Global Board Leaders’ Summit puts technology and disruption front and center, with a variety of leading-edge speakers and sessions that focus on these themes. But more than just convening discussions, the director community get hands-on experience with emerging trends via Innovation Nation. This popular feature, launched at last year’s Summit, is back once again, featuring an even more robust cross-section of the trends, technologies, and innovations that are disrupting your businesses and shaping your world. This year’s exhibits include opportunities to immerse yourself in virtual reality, experience the sharing economy at work, and see the latest in drone technology up close. Here is a sampling of who will be on hand:

  • Dancing With the Start-Ups, a new feature modeled after the popular show Shark Tank, builds on popular sessions from past Summits that gave directors a chance to “Meet the Disruptors.” This fast-paced competition will feature 12 companies across three key industries—healthcare, financial services, and energy— to showcase the latest and greatest in emerging business. Both the competition and a booth showcasing the startup talent in Innovation Nation will offer Summit attendees the chance to meet the entrepreneurs who are hoping to be your next competitors in the marketplace. For those who can’t make the Sunday session, or who just want to get to know the companies a little better, swing by Innovation Nation to learn more about innovative new ways to diagnose malaria, the latest in solar energy technology, the intersection of market data with sustainability, and much more.
  • Dave Meadows is a self-described “lifelong ‘tinkerer’ and inventor”—inclinations that served him well in his former role as a senior research and development executive with Novartis International AG. Several years ago, Meadows set out to solve a problem that has plagued wine drinkers for nearly 9,000-years—adverse physical reactions, especially when drinking reds. Five years later, The Wand was born. This invention removes 95 percent of the histamines and sulfite preservatives from wine. The result—a whole legion of wine enthusiasts who had previously learned to avoid wine can once again partake without the fear of headaches and other adverse reactions. You can experience the power of The Wand firsthand and talk to Meadows about and his work in the areas of medical diagnostics, sports medicine, and consumer packaged goods.
  • Big data and analytics are driving the growth of nearly every business, from heavy hitters like General Electric and Alibaba to early stage start-ups and family farms. This new trend is poised to transform industries, power new business models, enable innovation, and create greater value. According to research from International Data Corporation, worldwide revenues for big data and analytics will grow to $187 billion by 2019—a 50 percent increase from revenues in 2014. But Powerlytics Inc. cofounder Kevin Sheetz cautions that, when it comes to data, big doesn’t mean better, and behind the hype are a number of critical questions boards should be asking to ensure their companies are taking full and smart advantage of this trend. Sheetz will be at the Summit to give directors real-time interaction with the company’s platform, which aggregates publicly available consumer and business financial data from sources like IRS tax returns, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • February 15, 2011 became a milestone in both game show and artificial intelligence (AI) history, as the IBM-designed super computer, Watson, bested previously undefeated players Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter to win Jeopardy! The Watson team has been hard at work in the intervening five years to use natural language processing and machine learning to make sense of large amounts of unstructured data. IBM developers will be available to demo this technology and answer questions about the intersection of AI and analytics.
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is reshaping the business landscape in ways that aren’t yet fully understood. The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) is one of many organizations harnessing the IoT to save lives. According to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were more than six million police-reported crashes on U.S. roads in 2015. While the number of people surviving car accidents has increased significantly thanks to airbags, antilock brakes, and other technology, USDOT’s Connected Vehicles program aims to stop many of those crashes from happening in the first place. This unique partnership between state and local transportation agencies, vehicle and device makers, and the public, aims to test and evaluate technology that will enable motor vehicles, roads and other infrastructure, and devices to “talk” to one another so every vehicle on the road is aware of the position of other nearby vehicles. Chris Gerdes, USDOT’s chief innovation officer, will discuss the program Monday on the main stage. Swing by the Innovation Nation to check out this technology, learn more about how you can bring the program to your home city, and get inspiration for how the IoT might just help your own business survive and thrive.

These are just a few snapshots of the incredible line-up of thought leaders and emerging technology at next month’s Summit. Want to learn more? View the full list of speakers and sessions at NACDonline.org/summit.

 

Crickets, Divorce, Silicon Valley, and the Future of Governance

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One of my favorite comments from an attendee at last year’s Global Board Leaders’ Summit went something like this: “I was expecting to be informed; I wasn’t expecting to be inspired.” For a team that works year-round scouring the globe to discover and deliver to you voices that are shaping the future, that’s about as good as it gets.

KenSummitMainStage

This year’s Global Board Leaders’ Summit is on track to be our biggest ever, and one big feature of the Summit remains the same: a diverse array of thought leaders will share paradigm-shifting insights that will challenge the way you think about leadership, give you new tools to approach your directorship practice, and perhaps inspire you in surprising ways.

Here’s a sampling of some of the most exciting sessions at Summit this year:

  • Michelle Crosby’s start-up Wevorce is not only shaking up Silicon Valley, it’s turning the historic, antagonistic model of divorce on its head. The company’s mission is to “help couples ensure their divorce is less damaging to themselves, their finances, and the people they love.” Crosby was named one of the American Bar Association’s Legal Rebels in 2014, a distinction reserved for “lawyers who are breaking new ground using technology.” “Every institution is subject to change, and the more entrepreneurs who learn to work in the system to create that change, the further we’re going to get,” Crosby said in an interview with USA Today. In an intimate fireside chat, Crosby will discuss innovation, entrepreneurship, disruption, and how the company applies the Wevorce model to talent management inside the company.
  • Howard Ross, one of the most highly rated thought leaders at last year’s Summit, is back again to share insights from his groundbreaking work on unconscious bias, diversity, leadership, and organizational change. The question directors should ask themselves, says Ross, is not “Is there bias?” Rather, directors should ask one another, “What biases do we have that keep us from making choices counter to the values that we say we believe in?” Ross will open the Diversity Symposium on Saturday and will lead an in-depth workshop on Monday focusing on board dynamics.
  • The United Nations estimates that by 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population may face fresh water shortages, a critical concern for business and society. Whitewater rafting guide turned CEO Pat Crowley is betting that the solution to that crisis might literally be in our backyards. Crowley’s passion for the outdoors led him to work as a water resource planner, which drew his curiosity to crickets, of all things. “I heard about insects as a more environmentally friendly form of nutrition. From a water perspective, it was clearly a game-changer,” he said. Crowley founded Chapul, a company that makes cricket-based energy bars, in 2012, “to leap over this psychological hurdle of eating insects in the United States.” With explosive growth— 500 percent annually for the past two years alone—Crowley is on track to break through those barriers. On the summit mainstage on Monday, Crowley will discuss what it means to be part of building a new industry that is challenging societal norms, reshaping the competitive landscape, and may just help save the planet.
  • Phil Gilbert has been working with start-ups for the past 30 years, the most recent of which was acquired by IBM in 2010. Now Gilbert leads IBM’s design team with a focus on an empathy-centered workforce. Bringing a start-up mentality to 100-year-old company can be a challenge and almost immediately Gilbert was forced to confront a disconcerting question: “Is the entire way we’re working an anachronism?” Embracing that hard truth has been nothing short of transformational. Gilbert comes to the Summit mainstage to discuss lessons learned in this transformation. “We’re at an interesting crossroads in business. I think the way business is done and businesses work inside themselves has got to fundamentally change in the twenty-first century,” he said.
  • As managing director of famed Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, Scott Kupor has been part of building brands like Airbnb, Buzzfeed, Facebook, Foursquare, Lyft, Pinterest, and Skype—companies that have become synonymous with disruption. “Things that are fringe today might become mainstream over time,” Kupor explained on Fox News back in June, describing the philosophy that underpins Andreessen Horowitz’s approach to finding the next disruptive trend. In a mainstage fireside chat Tuesday, Kupor will discuss this philosophy in context with everything from M&A activity and shareholder activism, to IPO trends and the next big innovations he sees poised to disrupt the business landscape.
  • When Chelsea Grayson took on the role of general counsel at American Apparel, she faced a daunting task: to help turn around a company that was operating in an increasingly competitive industry and was coming off of a tumultuous series of events, including high-profile sexual harassment allegations, layoffs, bankruptcy, and protests. In February, Grayson told the legal blog Above the Law, “I have been in-house for over a year now, and I have encountered just about every legal issue a general counsel might experience in an entire career.” Next month, Grayson will share her insights on governing complexity, a subject she has become adept at navigating during her tenure at American Apparel.

These are just a few snapshots of the incredible line-up of thought leaders who will join us in September. Want to learn more? View the full list of speakers and sessions at www.NACDonline.org/summit.