Tag Archive: cybersecurity

Leveraging the Risks and Rewards of Information Technology

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As information technology (IT) continues to evolve, so do the oversight responsibilities of corporate directors. From big data analytics to social media to cybersecurity, technology creates opportunities for companies to innovate, to create operational efficiencies, and to develop a competitive advantage.

These potential rewards can bring significant risks, however. Directors have the task of ensuring technology is integrated into both company strategy and enterprise risk management—and to do so they must first gain a deeper understanding of how technology is impacting their businesses.

To help directors ensure they are prepared to leverage both the risks and rewards of IT, NACD developed an eight-part video series—The Intersection of Technology, Strategy, and Risk in partnership with KPMG and ISACA.

The series includes insights from leading technology experts and top executives from AT&T, Citigroup, Dunkin’ Brands, Kaiser Permanente, and  Oracle, among others, and focuses on critical IT areas for directors, such as:

  • how emerging technologies are altering the business landscape;
  • critical questions boards should be asking about technology;
  • the role of the CIO;
  • disruptive technologies;
  • fostering innovation;
  • balancing IT risks and opportunities;
  • cybersecurity; and
  • social media.

To complement the video series, NACD has additional resources, including white papers, articles, webinars, full transcripts of each video, and a discussion guide for directors who would like to take a deeper dive and bring these topics into their own boardrooms.

To watch The Intersection of Technology, Strategy, and Risk video series and access the supplemental resources, visit NACDonline.org/IT.

Cybersecurity – Improvements Needed in the Boardroom

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Cybersecurity is undoubtedly a critical aspect of board oversight, but an overwhelming majority of directors rate their and their board’s knowledge of IT risk as “in need of improvement.” More than three quarters of directors believe their personal IT knowledge could use a boost and nearly 90 percent believe the same of their board’s IT knowledge. A lack of cyber knowledge at the board level can lead to overreliance on C-suite experts and difficulty by directors in judging an appropriate level of involvement.

Recognizing the disconnect between the need for effective cybersecurity oversight and the boardroom’s lack of IT acumen, NACD, supported by Protiviti and Dentons, convened three roundtable discussions, bringing together directors, executives, and experts in the field of cybersecurity. These meetings provided insight into the numerous and significant risks presented by cybersecurity, while experts pinpointed deficiencies in board responses to threats and possible solutions. Key statements from participants prompted NACD, Protiviti, and Dentons to address issues demanding director attention and action:

  • Boardroom cyber literacy: “Cyber literacy can be considered similar to financial literacy. Not everyone on the board is an auditor, but everyone should be able to read a financial statement and understand the financial language of business.”
  • Identifying high-value information targets: “Do not just harden the perimeter, because hackers will get in. Accept that they can get in, and then design the strategy with the assumption they are already ‘inside.’”
  • Formulating detection and response plans: “When your company is hacked, do not start spending money like a drunken sailor.”
  • The human factor: “People are the constant weakness. Cybersecurity is a human issue. Often the biggest problems are caused by an inadvertent actor.”

Cybersecurity: Boardroom Implications contains information on these issues and more, including questions directors can ask when planning for a breach and when a breach is discovered. Click here for your complimentary copy of the report.

The Boardroom Reality of Cyberattacks

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It is requisite to start every NACD session on boardroom oversight of cybersecurity with the adage: “There are two types of companies: those that know they have been hacked and those that don’t.” And so begins the one- to two-hour panel discussions—experts in cyber technology outlining and explaining the various methods that have already been employed to hack into companies. Understandably, attendees usually leave these sessions a bit pale and speechless.

Cyberattacks on the private sector are a reality, not merely a threat. In 2013, 50 percent of companies with more than 5,000 employees surveyed by the Ponemon Institute reported one or more phishing attacks, a figure that has nearly doubled since 2009. Further, it is those at the higher levels of organizations that are targeted in attacks. In a recent Verizon report on data breaches, it was reported that executives—with higher public profiles and access to secure information—top the list of employee categories targeted in phishing attacks.

Oversight of cybersecurity is at the intersection of national security and the private sector. In the most recent issue of NACD Directorship magazine, Jeff Cunningham, in “The Art of Cyber War,” details the evolution of the cyber battle currently ensuing between China and the United States. Under Chairman Mao, China was defended by the Red Guard. Today, however, the Red Guard has been replaced by “digital warriors,” expert in technology and the English language, working from residential areas of China. In a report representing the culmination of six years of research from Mandiant—an American security company—Chinese hackers have stolen technology blueprints, negotiating strategies, and manufacturing processes from more than 100, mostly American, companies.

At NACD’s Spring Forum this week, cybersecurity expert Richard A. Clarke summarized the current environment: “China does not want to fight the United States in a military war, they want an economic war. You have the Chinese government against your company.” During this session, however, Clarke and Karl Hopkins from SNR Denton went beyond the harsh realities of cyber risk to provide guidance that directors can use at their next board meeting.

  • Understand you are on your own. The government’s cyber defense budget is allocated toward the military and national security, not toward the private sector. It is up to each company to create a cyber defense strategy.
  • Define and protect the “crown jewels.” Companies can’t afford to defend every aspect of the organization. As such, it is wise to develop a minimalist strategy that foremost protects the sources of competitive advantage.
  • Don’t wait for the “big event.” Most frequently, companies are not crippled by one significant event, but instead a “death of one thousand cuts”—a slow creep of proprietary information.
  • Incorporate the general counsel. At most organizations, the role of the CIO is to keep the company running and costs down, and therefore the CIO may not be the best choice to be responsible for cyber risk management. At American Express, for example, the general counsel has a key role in cyber risk management.
  • Spend intelligently. You can spend the entire company’s budget on cyber defense and still not know if the company is truly secure. The company should develop a defense strategy first, and then purchase the necessary supporting technology.
  • Ask the right questions. At the next board meeting, directors should ask: “Have we been breached?” Then, “what forensics team have we brought in to look at these threats?” Most likely, directors will require outside expertise to aid in the understanding of cyber risks.

Technology risk oversight is an area that will require more dedicated effort in the future. As such, NACD will continue to raise the discussion with white papers at upcoming educational events and in our NACD Directorship 2020 initiative.