Tag Archive: CES Experience

Disruption or Distraction? Focused Oversight in the Age of Innovation

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Peter Gleason

Over the years, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas has featured miles of technology and millions of people—2.75 million square feet for 3,900 booths and nearly 185,000 attendees in 2018 alone.

Under those tents are innovations that will disrupt markets and your companies. The question is, which ones?

Not every innovation is disruptive, and not every market is vulnerable. According to a recent blog by Harvard professor Clayton M. Christensen, written shortly before the most recent CES event in January, “disruptive innovation,” a term Christensen coined in 1995, is “the process by which products and services, often less expensive and less sophisticated, move upmarket until they displace established competitors.”

Displacement is no fun; it generally means downsizing and can mean demise. So directors naturally want their companies to disrupt, rather than be disrupted. That’s why NACD launched the NACD CES Experience in partnership with Grant Thornton. Participants enjoyed a director-curated tour and program that explored the technology trends of greatest relevance to business, helping attendees see implications for their own companies.

General trends highlighted on the tour included the impact of artificial intelligence, machine learning, chip and processing technologies, and sensor technologies on human-machine interface. The small group of directors also witnessed new technologies in voice input and response, image and vision interactions, biometrics, digital assistants, computational photography, shoppable images, virtual environments, and biometric trackers.

NACD inaugurated a similar annual event last July, the NACD Technology Symposium, where directors toured businesses in Silicon Valley, interacting with innovators there. And in April 2018, NACD will host a Global Cyber Forum in Geneva, Switzerland. NACD, working with others, has been providing cyber-risk oversight guidance for directors since the year 2000, most recently with the NACD Director’s Handbook on Cyber-Risk Oversight, 2017 edition. Also our Emerging Issues resource center has a segment on the impact of technology change.

Such programs, encouraging focus amid complexity and change, are models for what board leadership is all about: focused oversight. Based on my own board service, and on my decades of dialogue with directors, I believe that identifying and prioritizing issues for oversight is the single most important value that boards bring to organizations. It’s opposite of the “shiny thing” syndrome, in which our attention darts to whatever is new and interesting.

In a video interview with several directors at the opening day of CES, NACD Chief Programming Officer Erin Essenmacher asked why they came. Lianne Pelletier, whose views on CES were recently featured in the Wall Street Journal, focused on infrastructure, a key topic at Expeditors International, where she serves as a director. John Hotta, a director at First Washington Robotics, focused on the accessibility of platforms like Amazon’s Alexa. Maureen Conners, on the board of Fashion Incubator San Francisco, said that directors should bring the top “three to five” issues to the attention of their CEO to ask for a report on strategic implications.

In short, all the directors interviewed said that they wanted broader horizons but would continue to focus straight ahead.

CES Tour Reveals Trends and Innovations That Will Reshape Business

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Shelly Palmer guides directors through the show floor.

At the conclusion of day two of NACD and Grant Thornton’s board-focused experience at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), my feet are throbbing, my head is spinning, and I have a clearer picture of what the future holds thanks to a much sought-after spot at Shelly Palmer’s breakfast lecture on innovation and future trends, which was followed by an exclusive, small-group tour of this colossal show—some 3,900 exhibitors in all.

According to Palmer, the next-generation automobiles displayed by Mitsubishi, Nissan, Ford, and so many other companies raises the following question: How will we move—or want to be moved—from point A to point B?

“What does it mean to get from here to there? Uber is already self-driving. I push a few buttons and the car shows up,” Palmer said as he took us through the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center—home to what has been dubbed the world’s largest auto show.

Among the flashier electric vehicles on display was the Mercedes-AMG Project ONE Showcar, an electric hybrid Formula 1 race car. While only 275 of these cars will be made, the technology applied in its engineering eventually could end up in your self-driving car. AI might also sneak its way in. (To see more about the implications of AI, watch Erin Essenmacher’s interview with data scientist J.T. Kostman.)

Palmer also highlighted the following provocative insights to the directors in our tour group:

  • Smart speakers are among the fastest-adopted technologies, having achieved 50-percent penetration in U.S. homes in just three years.
  • Any device powered by electricity will be voice-controlled.
  • While Amazon is not exhibiting at this year’s show, its presence was abundantly visible through some 30,000 examples of apps compatible with its Alexa device.
  • Companies that may be considered old-line—Blackberry, Honeywell, ADP—have reinvented themselves through their understanding and embrace of technology that makes us more secure. “Security,” Palmer said, “is the gateway drug to home systems.”
  • At Honda’s booth, spectators were charmed by an adorable three-foot robot. The Japanese automaker discovered after the devastating tsunami in 2011 that children responded to the robot, which is capable of expressing empathy. “Americans have no interest in this,” Palmer said, adding this nugget: “Robotics are way ahead of anthropology and sociology.”
  • Chinese companies are the world’s leader in artificial intelligence. Google and Facebook lead in America. The presence of Chinese companies exhibiting at CES was a quantum leap over last year.
  • Some 15 million American homes have cut the cable cord and instead have roof antennas for TV service. So how can Comcast expect to flourish? The broadband giant will provide its customers the ability to connect various Internet of Things technologies that can be controlled through its voice remote.

More insights from CES and directors’ impressions of the governance implications raised by some of what they experienced will be covered in the January/February 2018 issue of NACD Directorship magazine. You can also watch the video below of NACD Chief Programming Officer Erin Essenmacher discussing AI with data scientist J.T. Kostman.

The Future Is Now at CES

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The 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) opened to the public yesterday in Las Vegas. With over 3,900 exhibitors from 29 countries, there is a lot to absorb.

For a group of some 40 directors, a sneak peek of CES given courtesy of the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) and Grant Thornton LLP provided a focused beginning to a three-day exploration of new technology—from robots to self-driving cars and augmented reality to smarter cities—and the implications for corporate governance.

To see more highlights from the floor, click here.

For Grant Thornton, supporting NACD’s first CES Experience underscores the accounting firm’s position “as a challenger brand in the marketplace,” said Michael Desmond, a partner and National Audit Industry & Growth Leader at Grant Thornton. “Being here at CES with a group of directors allows us to support our partnership with NACD and continue our reach into the marketplace at the C-suite and board levels. At the same time, this is where forward thinking and innovation are on display and all of these elements converge.”

Accompanying Desmond was David Wedding, a Grant Thornton partner who also chairs the firm’s board. “I’m here as a director myself and we, of course, are facing disruption in our industry from the impact of technology just like our customers. It will be interesting to see what’s trending and how other directors assess the ramifications of what we see.”

Maureen Conners, a director of Fashion Incubator in San Francisco and NACD’s Northern California Chapter, and former director of Deckers Brands, has been attending CES for at least 15 years. “The best advice I would give to any one coming to CES is not to be afraid to ask the dumb questions,” she said. Conners worked in product development at Gillette, Levi Strauss, and Mattel and started attending CES when as a consultant she helped Polaroid launch its first digital camera. She spoke of how seeing a driverless car maneuver onto a stage during an Intel presentation on Monday night stirred questions for her about how they will ultimately be used.

“I must admit it’s different seeing it in person,” she said.

Liane Pelletier, a director who was on the tour, serves on the boards of ATN International, Expeditors International, and NACD’s Northwest Chapter, echoed that sentiment: “It’s one thing to read about discrete enabling technologies that can disrupt our companies, and it’s entirely different to see and envision all of the use cases.”

Some of the other new products that stand to have industry-altering impacts included: a concept bed from Reverie that adjusts itself based on brain-wave activity; a self-driving Lyft vehicle; and a plush Aflac duck robot with three patents pending that uses a mixed-reality app to help comfort kids coping with cancer.

Come back tomorrow for additional coverage of NACD and Grant Thornton’s board-focused CES Experience.