Tag Archive: Board evaluations

Tools & Insights for Effective Board and Director Evaluations

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The practice of conducting full-board, committee, and/or individual-director evaluations has largely become commonplace. Ninety percent of respondents to the 2016─2107 NACD Public Company Governance Survey: Aggregate Results say their companies conduct full-board evaluations. Approximately 78 percent of respondents facilitate committee evaluations, and 41 percent conduct individual director evaluations, the survey finds.

The New York Stock Exchange since 2003 has required listed companies to disclose how their boards address evaluations. Although Nasdaq-listed companies have no such requirements, many conduct these assessments to enhance governance standards. NACD has long been an advocate for routine board, committee, and individual-director evaluations as part of a larger strategy of continuous improvement.

In keeping with these listing requirements and recommendations from our research, NACD recently created the Resource Center on Board Evaluations. Resource centers are repositories for NACD content, services, and events related to top-of-mind issues for directors. In these resource centers, individuals can find practical guidance, tools, and analyses on subjects varying from board diversity to cyber-risk oversight. Below we have highlighted a sample of helpful materials from our new board-evaluations resource center.

Thought Leadership & Research

The Report of the NACD Blue Ribbon Commission on Board Evaluation: Improving Director Effectiveness explores how boards and directors can use self- and peer-assessments to enhance board performance and director effectiveness. The report emphasizes that, while there is no one-size-fits-all approach to board evaluations, a commitment to ongoing assessments is indispensable when it comes to enhancing  corporate governance practices and performance.

Expert Commentary

The NACD Directorship magazine article “The Argument for Yearly Board Evaluations” by Salvatore Melilli, national audit industry leader for private markets at KPMG, examines the importance of assessments specifically for private company boards. Less than half (48%) of respondents to the 2016─2017 NACD Private Company Governance Survey say their boards conduct full-board evaluations.  Melilli’s article highlights several reasons why evaluations are critical to improving oversight evaluations. They can help vet company and board culture, identify gaps in talent or skillsets, and streamline processes for the board to engage in difficult conversations with the executive team.

Boardroom Tools & Templates

This resource center’s boardroom tools and templates are segmented by evaluation type—full-board, committee, and individual-director levels. The tools offer questions and considerations that help boards and directors ask questions that can drive healthy conversations about strengths and areas of improvement.

Videos & Webinars

An NACD video series featured in the resource center focuses on the role board evaluations play in improving governance practices. One video in the series, called “Why Confidentiality is Key,” focuses on the benefits of confidentiality in the evaluation process. Another video, “Transform Insight into Action,” discusses the value of creating tailored educational or development programs based on insights that emerge from evaluations.

If you would like help finding resources on a specific subject matter, please let us know. We welcome the opportunity to engage with directors on pressing needs and concerns.

Unique Dynamics, Common Issues

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As NACD general counsel and head of Board Advisory Services (BAS), I’ve gained tremendous insight interacting with all types of boards from startups to the top of the Fortune 500. Each board comes with its own unique dynamics, incorporating differing personalities, skill sets, advantages, and obstacles. But despite these differences—and regardless of the size and sophistication of the board—there are several common issues with which most boards are grappling.

While I’ve seen just about every scenario one could imagine, BAS is typically engaged for the following reasons:

  1. The company has reached a turning point in its strategy, which has created tension and a need for alignment with the board and management.
  2. The board is struggling with directors’ extended tenure on the board, which has created a stale environment and an obstacle to fresh thinking.
  3. Often related to the second point, the board is wrestling with the thorny issue of succession planning and how to deal with underperforming directors.
  4. The board is composed of strong, experienced directors, but management does not feel they are as engaged as they could be and are not bringing all their skills to the table.

In each situation I’ve found that our clients, despite facing significant pressure points, all have the desire to improve. Even the most sophisticated boards are willing to admit they don’t have all the answers. As such, they bring NACD—as an objective third party—into their boardroom to assist in identifying steps for improvement.

In my next posts, I will drill down further into these common issues. How are companies dealing with underperforming directors? What new succession planning techniques are working? Does extended tenure affect director independence, engagement levels, and the creation of fresh ideas? How can the board and management team be more effectively aligned?

Combatting Information Asymmetry

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At any NACD education program, the discussion of directorship as a part-time profession with full-time risks is bound to arise. Yet following any corporate crisis, the question is always asked: “Where was the board?” Outside of the C-suite and boardroom, many perceive that directors should be able to foresee and avoid a crisis before it strikes.

This perception is misguided for several reasons. As a result of legislative and regulatory activity, since the 1960s corporate boards have become increasingly independent of management. Although legislation such as Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank mandated independence at specific committees, this has extended to the entire board. Today, most publicly held company boards comprise a majority of independent directors, and often the CEO is the only executive director.[1]

The development of independent boards is not negative. In fact, it ensures that the board can effectively carry out its mission and responsibilities, and fairly hold management accountable to shareholders. However, there are a few consequences when directors are selected entirely for independence. Directorship, as noted above, is a part-time role. Inherently, directors rely on senior management for information necessary to carry out their oversight responsibilities. When outside directors are chosen for lack of ties to the corporation, they do not necessarily bring knowledge of the business or industry. Therefore, the benefit created by adding an independent director is largely tempered, as this outsider is reliant on the CEO for the information necessary to his or her oversight role.

To combat this risk of asymmetric information, NACD partnered with McGladrey to host four small gatherings of executives and directors in an effort to find ways of improving the communication and relationships between the board and C-suite. From these gatherings, the Bridging Effectiveness Gaps: A Candid Look at Board Practices white paper was created. As Bridging the Effectiveness Gaps notes, broadly, these gaps were found in the areas of strategy and risk, executive compensation, CEO succession planning, and board evaluations. By convening management and directors from different companies, the meetings fostered candid and open conversation regarding areas where communication tends to break down. However, where communication was generally the root of the problem, it was also the solution.

This report is available as a complimentary white paper on NACD’s Board Leaders’ Briefing Center.



[1] According to the 2012 Spencer Stuart U.S. Board Index.