Tag Archive: 2018 CES Experience

CES Tour Reveals Trends and Innovations That Will Reshape Business

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Shelly Palmer guides directors through the show floor.

At the conclusion of day two of NACD and Grant Thornton’s board-focused experience at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), my feet are throbbing, my head is spinning, and I have a clearer picture of what the future holds thanks to a much sought-after spot at Shelly Palmer’s breakfast lecture on innovation and future trends, which was followed by an exclusive, small-group tour of this colossal show—some 3,900 exhibitors in all.

According to Palmer, the next-generation automobiles displayed by Mitsubishi, Nissan, Ford, and so many other companies raises the following question: How will we move—or want to be moved—from point A to point B?

“What does it mean to get from here to there? Uber is already self-driving. I push a few buttons and the car shows up,” Palmer said as he took us through the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center—home to what has been dubbed the world’s largest auto show.

Among the flashier electric vehicles on display was the Mercedes-AMG Project ONE Showcar, an electric hybrid Formula 1 race car. While only 275 of these cars will be made, the technology applied in its engineering eventually could end up in your self-driving car. AI might also sneak its way in. (To see more about the implications of AI, watch Erin Essenmacher’s interview with data scientist J.T. Kostman.)

Palmer also highlighted the following provocative insights to the directors in our tour group:

  • Smart speakers are among the fastest-adopted technologies, having achieved 50-percent penetration in U.S. homes in just three years.
  • Any device powered by electricity will be voice-controlled.
  • While Amazon is not exhibiting at this year’s show, its presence was abundantly visible through some 30,000 examples of apps compatible with its Alexa device.
  • Companies that may be considered old-line—Blackberry, Honeywell, ADP—have reinvented themselves through their understanding and embrace of technology that makes us more secure. “Security,” Palmer said, “is the gateway drug to home systems.”
  • At Honda’s booth, spectators were charmed by an adorable three-foot robot. The Japanese automaker discovered after the devastating tsunami in 2011 that children responded to the robot, which is capable of expressing empathy. “Americans have no interest in this,” Palmer said, adding this nugget: “Robotics are way ahead of anthropology and sociology.”
  • Chinese companies are the world’s leader in artificial intelligence. Google and Facebook lead in America. The presence of Chinese companies exhibiting at CES was a quantum leap over last year.
  • Some 15 million American homes have cut the cable cord and instead have roof antennas for TV service. So how can Comcast expect to flourish? The broadband giant will provide its customers the ability to connect various Internet of Things technologies that can be controlled through its voice remote.

More insights from CES and directors’ impressions of the governance implications raised by some of what they experienced will be covered in the January/February 2018 issue of NACD Directorship magazine. You can also watch the video below of NACD Chief Programming Officer Erin Essenmacher discussing AI with data scientist J.T. Kostman.

The Future Is Now at CES

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The 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) opened to the public yesterday in Las Vegas. With over 3,900 exhibitors from 29 countries, there is a lot to absorb.

For a group of some 40 directors, a sneak peek of CES given courtesy of the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) and Grant Thornton LLP provided a focused beginning to a three-day exploration of new technology—from robots to self-driving cars and augmented reality to smarter cities—and the implications for corporate governance.

To see more highlights from the floor, click here.

For Grant Thornton, supporting NACD’s first CES Experience underscores the accounting firm’s position “as a challenger brand in the marketplace,” said Michael Desmond, a partner and National Audit Industry & Growth Leader at Grant Thornton. “Being here at CES with a group of directors allows us to support our partnership with NACD and continue our reach into the marketplace at the C-suite and board levels. At the same time, this is where forward thinking and innovation are on display and all of these elements converge.”

Accompanying Desmond was David Wedding, a Grant Thornton partner who also chairs the firm’s board. “I’m here as a director myself and we, of course, are facing disruption in our industry from the impact of technology just like our customers. It will be interesting to see what’s trending and how other directors assess the ramifications of what we see.”

Maureen Conners, a director of Fashion Incubator in San Francisco and NACD’s Northern California Chapter, and former director of Deckers Brands, has been attending CES for at least 15 years. “The best advice I would give to any one coming to CES is not to be afraid to ask the dumb questions,” she said. Conners worked in product development at Gillette, Levi Strauss, and Mattel and started attending CES when as a consultant she helped Polaroid launch its first digital camera. She spoke of how seeing a driverless car maneuver onto a stage during an Intel presentation on Monday night stirred questions for her about how they will ultimately be used.

“I must admit it’s different seeing it in person,” she said.

Liane Pelletier, a director who was on the tour, serves on the boards of ATN International, Expeditors International, and NACD’s Northwest Chapter, echoed that sentiment: “It’s one thing to read about discrete enabling technologies that can disrupt our companies, and it’s entirely different to see and envision all of the use cases.”

Some of the other new products that stand to have industry-altering impacts included: a concept bed from Reverie that adjusts itself based on brain-wave activity; a self-driving Lyft vehicle; and a plush Aflac duck robot with three patents pending that uses a mixed-reality app to help comfort kids coping with cancer.

Come back tomorrow for additional coverage of NACD and Grant Thornton’s board-focused CES Experience.

A Walk-Up to CES: What to Expect from the Annual Tech Extravaganza

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Driverless vehicles; virtual and augmented reality; wearables that monitor health, sleep, and stress; smarter features for the home and cities; and bigger, thinner televisions. Innovation has always been central to what used to be called the Consumer Electronics Show, which this year marks its 51st anniversary. These are just some of the product categories being touted in advance of the opening next week of CES in Las Vegas.

For the first time, NACD and Grant Thornton LLP will host CES Experience, which will include a tour for a small group of directors that is curated by Shelly Palmer. This annual hub of technology innovation now spans nearly a mile in and around the Las Vegas convention center. It is a colossal undertaking both for attendees and the organizer, the Consumer Electronics Association, which this year brings together 3,900 exhibitors, 67,321 exhibit personnel, more than 109,000 attendees, and some 7,400 members of the media.

There are 600 startups in just one wing of the show.

When NACD’s Chief Programming Officer Erin Essenmacher attended CES last year, she was nearly overwhelmed by the sheer number of exhibitors introducing potentially game-changing products. To both maximize her time and see those exhibitors most likely to be showing a next-generation gadget, Essenmacher recognized that a director-centric guided tour of this mecca of innovation could benefit NACD members.

An autonomous vehicle from Ford that was on display at CES 2017 delivers Dominoes Pizza.

CES 2018 opens Tuesday, Jan. 9, with a keynote address by Ford Motor Co. president and CEO James Hackett, the first “non-car guy” to helm the 114-year old automaker. Hackett has proclaimed the new Ford to be a mobility technology company, with vehicle safety to be driven by innovations in artificial intelligence (AI) rather than new material or safety features. Since he took the reins in May, Hackett, formerly president and CEO of Steelcase, has invested in self-driving and electric-powered autos and car-to-car communications. Ford was the first automaker to exhibit at CES at least 11 years ago and over the years almost every major automaker has become a regular. Innovations in the automotive industry have become so ubiquitous at CES that the North Hall of the convention center has been dubbed the “Las Vegas auto show.” At least 12 of the more than 200 information sessions at CES will be devoted to automotive-related topics such as cybersecurity and who insures the driverless car.

Part of NACD’s curated tour will be spent exploring person-to-machine interfaces and machine-learning sensors that can detect humans’ moods. Directors will also see advancements in haptic (from the Greek haptesthai, “to touch”)technology, which has evolved beyond vibration to synthesize feedback from even simple hand gestures made on a tactile screen.

At the end of each day, directors will have an opportunity to debrief and compare notes over dinner.

I will be blogging for NACD from CES and colleagues will be posting on social media.

Judy Warner is editor in chief of NACD Directorship magazine.