Tag Archive: 2016 NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit

Here’s What You Missed

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This year’s NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit did not disappoint. In fact, we upped the ante with hard-hitting keynote addresses (including an “orbital” governance perspective, a comprehensive approach to cybersecurity, and a geopolitical-risk outlook), unprecedented networking opportunities, and can’t-get-them-anywhere-else experiences.

Our 1,300 attendees represented just about every state, 15 countries, and nearly 30 percent of the Fortune 1000. And 60 percent were “Summit regulars”—they keep coming back for more.

Couldn’t join us live? We’ve got the ultimate recap (in no particular order). Here’s what you missed.

Dancing With the Start-Ups

We no longer live in the Mad Men era, when several large brands dominated a particular industry. Start-ups are changing the business landscape and the ways in which we live and work. In partnership with KITE and KPMG, Dancing With the Start-Ups was a competition that invited 12 promising start-ups in three industries to pitch their company in four minutes—and the winner received a prize package worth $30,000. Read this press release to find out who won.

The No. 1 Risk Your Company Is Likely Overlooking

Conversations about culture risk dominated the Strategy and Risk Board Committee Forum and other breakout sessions. Discussions focused on red flags, establishing a stronger onboarding process, and concrete methods for fully engaging board members in their duties as directors.

Diversity

Diversity was not only embodied and discussed during its eponymous half-day Symposium—which focused on the realities of unconscious bias, building the twenty-first century board, and unlocking innovation through diversity—but also was enhanced by the diverse industries, attendee experience levels, and types of companies represented at the Symposium, as well as the learning formats, input, and content of each session throughout the entire Summit. 

Who did our attendees represent?               

38% – Female
62%- Male
30% – Fortune 1000
48 States
15 Countries
190 Board Chairs
43 Industries
47% – Audit Committee
35% – Compensation Committee
39% – Nominating/Governance Committee
7% – Risk Committee

Crickets, Divorce, and the Strategic-Asset Board

Supported by programming that ranged from the newest technologies and emerging ideas to compensation challenges and company strategy, we worked hard to ensure Summit struck the right balance of innovation and need-to-know governance guidance. (See more on eating crickets, the future of divorce, and ways to build a strategic-asset board.)

How to Land Your Next Board Seat

Back by popular demand, this session was standing room only. Whether you were seeking your first board seat or your fifth, “Landing Your Next Board Seat” offered practical takeaways for directors at all career levels.

Higher Ambitions

“Society needs financial wealth . . . but it matters how you make the money,” said Rajendra Sisodia, cofounder and cochair of Conscious Capitalism Inc., and director of the Container Store Group. “Businesses not only create—they can destroy financial wealth, as well.” This keynote by Sisodia was followed by lively discussions on how to develop a higher-ambition board.

Exclusive Opportunities for NACD Fellows

To recognize NACD Fellows (479 in attendance!), several special events were held, including a reception that offered a sneak peek of Innovation Nation, exclusive access to content, networking, and a special gift.

Golf Simulation, Virtual Reality, and Georgetown Cupcakes

Our Innovation Nation and Partner Showcase offered attendees a unique environment to practice their swing, check out the latest in virtual reality, sample famous local fare, and network. (If you didn’t want to try the crickets, you could taste a glass of wine—sans sulfates.)

Our Members Are Raving

Here are just a few of the glowing reviews attendees left at the end of Summit.

gblscomments“Summit was the best ever, by a wide margin. This year, you made it a must-attend event!”

“This is the best conferenceI [have attended] every year for four years running—the most innovation, the best new governance ideas, and the best networking. Thank you!”

“Fast paced and exciting! I loved the emphasis on introducing us to innovations happening in the business world today.”

“Thank you for leaning into conscious capitalism and socially responsible business. I’m pleasantly surprised that NACD is so progressive in [its] thinking.”

“NACD has become a thought-provoking forum for the future of business. Governance is important, but is table stakes. Kudos for being on the leading edge of business sustainability and disruptive strategy.”

Like what you’ve heard? MARK YOUR CALENDAR AND JOIN US IN 2017

SAVE BIG BEFORE DECEMBER 31
NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit
Oct. 1–4 | National Harbor, MD
National Harbor, MD

Convergence Through Conscientious Governance

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“The last several decades have proven that, more than ever, we are all interconnected and interdependent,” said NACD Chair Karen Horn. “We will rise—or fall—together, based on that trust.”

Karen Horn NACD Chair

NACD Board Chair Karen Horn

Horn’s opening speech at the recent 2016 NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit revealed a compelling case for strong, conscientious corporate governance in light of recent political, economic, and social turbulence.

Horn’s governance experience is extensive and includes serving as a director at Simon Property Group, vice chair of the U.S. Russia Foundation, and vice chair of the National Bureau of Economic Research. She also previously served as chair of the audit committee at Norfolk Southern Corp., lead director and chair of the compensation committee at Eli Lilly & Co., and a director of T. Rowe Price Mutual Funds.

Horn began by thanking outgoing NACD chair Reatha Clark King for “her leadership and her positive influence on our organization’s growth,” and praised the audience for their own strength of leadership in the boardroom. She then turned to the guiding concept behind this Summit’s programming—convergence.

“Convergence is an important theme at a time when our world appears to be tearing itself apart,” Horn said.  She pointed out that hostility seems to be the prevailing sentiment of our time and that frustrations with the current domestic and geopolitical environments are the impetuses for growing division. “I feel we must focus on a wider, longer view—a more broadly encompassing perspective that leads us back toward convergence,” she said.

Horn—who previously served as president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and as an economist for the board of governors of the Federal Reserve—made several recommendations meant to address the evolving relationship between society and capitalism, using conscientious governance. (For more information on the roles of capitalism and corporations, view the NACD blog post “Re-Thinking Capitalism: Best-Selling Author Espouses Higher Calling for Boards.”)

Addressing Income Inequality

Directors can take a role in addressing social issues like income inequality, Karen said, adding that income inequality is an example of a challenge that “affects not only our immediate stakeholders, but everyone downstream who will be affected in the long term as well as the short term.”

Horn agrees that free trade is an excellent driver of economic value across the board, but that the path to growth can unintentionally leave some individuals behind. She suggested public, private, and government entities alike should develop programs that lift up those who are taken advantage of or otherwise harmed on the path to greater economic progress. “Looking at an issue like this from the perspective of those who will not benefit, or may even be hurt by it, is the first step toward finding compromises and solutions that will minimize negative fallout,” Horn said about the corporation’s role in growth as a greater good.

One such program that directors could collaborate with policy makers, social leaders, and other stakeholders on is how to address the controversial debate over minimum wage increases. “Everyone has an opinion, and it is clearly a divisive issue,” Horn conceded to the audience. “If we are to find a solution that works, again, we must become familiar with the divergent perspectives.”

The Imperative to Lead

Capitalism is being impacted by “globalism, social and demographic shifts, new technology, increased transparency and resource scarcity,” According to Horn. In the face of these paradigm shifts, directors have the opportunity to converge with stakeholders to build a better path forward for all, and have a unique opportunity to rebuild the public’s trust in the role of corporations.

“People are searching for leaders they can trust, leaders who are smart, confident and strong—who are understanding and compassionate,” Horn said. “This is a role sometimes filled by government, but trust in government is at an all-time low, so the leadership gap needs to be filled. I believe we are some of the leaders who can and should fill that gap.”

Horn’s address closed with a charge to directors that will resound through her term as chair of NACD and beyond.

“Corporate America has an immense amount of talent, and we need to step up before we are stepped over,” she entreated. “There is no question that we have the ability to take this leadership challenge, but only if we act responsibly, transparently, honestly and with careful regard for different perspectives. If we can do that, we can move our culture back toward civil discourse—toward convergence.”

Re-Thinking Capitalism: Best-Selling Author Espouses Higher Calling for Boards

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“Society needs financial wealth … but it matters how you make the money,” said Rajendra Sisodia, co-founder and co-chair of Conscious Capitalism Inc., and director of the Container Store Group. “Businesses not only create, they can destroy financial wealth, as well.”

Raj Sisodia NACD Summit

Sisodia, a marketing professor at Babson University whose published books include Conscious Capitalism and Firms of Endearment, delivered a keynote address on capitalism’s transformative power Tuesday at NACD’s Global Board Leaders’ Summit. The four-day summit convened more than 1,300 attendees—the world’s largest gathering of corporate directors—in Washington, D.C. from Sept. 17-20.

Roots of Capitalism

One of the most significant conclusions of Scottish moral philosopher Adam Smith’s seminal 1776 book, An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (often referred to as The Wealth of Nations), was that places rooted in freedom tend to be more prosperous. Smith’s work became a foundational text on how capitalist markets work.

“That same year—an extraordinary historic coincident in some ways—the United States was born as a country, but more importantly, an idea. [It was] the only country born out of a set of ideas,” Sisodia said. “The ideas all revolved around liberty and freedom.” Entire segments of the American population, however, were not initially given access to that freedom—including African-Americans, native populations, and women—but the nation has extended freedoms steadily over the course of its nearly 250-year history.

“What is capitalism? Political and economic freedom,” Sisodia proclaimed. It’s rooted in the idea that free markets—or economic growth driven by individuals, rather than a centrally planned economy directed by the government or a political system—help people collectively elevate their material living conditions and boost prosperity, he said.

Poverty and Capitalism

A misperception about capitalism, Sisodia said, is that it exploits people of lower income brackets, locking them into poverty. Research, though, suggests that as capitalist markets have expanded, poverty rates have declined.

Data from the World Bank show that rates of extreme poverty have decreased considerably over the past three decades. More than half of people in the developing world lived on less than $1.25 per day in 1981, compared with 21 percent living on that amount per day in 2010.

Sisodia credited that decrease to prosperity derived from capitalism, saying that the key challenge for lifting the rest of the world out of poverty is not the unequal distribution of income, but the unequal distribution of freedom.

How the World Is Changing

“What will it take for companies to flourish in the future—and not just flourish for the purpose of making a lot of money, but actually be agents of flourishing in society?” Sisodia asked. The simple answer, he continued, is that you must be in harmony with the fact that people have changed over time to become, among other things, more:

  • There are now more mobile devices on Earth than there are people. The internet and use of social media have further connected the world. Facebook now claims 1.6 billion users.
  • The rate of serious violent crimes in U.S. public schools has dropped significantly to about one-third of what it was in 1994. Europe, Sisodia said, had experienced 1,200 wars in 600 years, but since 1945, inter-state wars on the continent have disappeared.
  • Sisodia described the so-called Flynn Effect, which suggests that there has been a consistent increase in IQ scores from 1930 to the present.
  • Embracing of “feminine” values. “I think the great story of this century is … the end of the suppression of the feminine [side of humanity],” Sisodia said. Women now earn more college degrees than men in the United States, and as a result, the expectation is that women will rise in positions of leadership—particularly in white-collar work settings. That will naturally mean that so-called feminine values, which he described as including cooperation, empathy, and compassion, will gain more traction in society.

Tenets of Conscious Capitalism

Accepting that the world is changing, Sisodia advised that businesses embrace the four tenets of conscious capitalism. That means to act with:

  • A higher purpose, or more specifically, a purpose beyond generating profits. Sisodia’s website provides a further explanation by quoting University of Virginia Darden School of Business professor and Conscious Capitalism, Inc. trustee, Ed Freeman: “We need red blood cells to live (the same way a business needs profits to live), but the purpose of life is more than to make red blood cells (the same way the purpose of business is more than simply to generate profits).”
  • A stakeholder orientation. Conscious businesses exist not only to maximize ROI for shareholders, but also seek to enhance value for all stakeholders, leading to a more resilient business.
  • Conscious leadership that demonstrates care for purpose and people; and
  • Conscious culture built on trust, care, and transparency—not rooted in fear and stress (the risk of having a heart attack is 20% higher on Mondays for men, 15% for women, and most research blames the stress of returning to work for these statistics).

Boards: Stewards of Well-Being

Sisodia offered several considerations aimed at helping boards—and companies—become more conscious overseers:

  • The primary duty of the board is to the corporation—which has its own significant role in society—rather than shareholders.
  • Understand and shape the company’s higher purpose. Ask your board to reflect on why the company would be missed if it were to disappear tomorrow.
  • Consciously seek to create value for all stakeholders.
  • Appoint strong leaders with a capacity for love and care. It is not healthy to appoint leaders who are analytically smart but lack empathy and other forms of emotional intelligence.
  • Build a culture of “full-spectrum” consciousness, meaning that you are not only concerned with service to people and a higher purpose, but also efficiency, effectiveness, and success.
  • Ensure youth and feminine perspectives are heeded when making business decisions.

Humanity is more aware of its challenges and problems than ever before, Sisodia said in closing, and the individual and collective capacity to respond to those challenges has never been higher. “We have to create the organizational forms and philosophies and build business on [the ideals of] purpose and caring. … [A]ll of those answers that we need to our crises are out there inside somebody. We just have to figure out how to liberate that.”