Tag Archive: 2013 NACD Board Leadership Conference

Relive the 2013 NACD Board Leadership Conference

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This year’s Board Leadership Conference was a great success with over 1,000 attendees and 150 speakers. NACD’s Research and Editorial team compiled—and posted to the NACD blog—written summaries and full-length videos for plenary sessions. Below is a list of these sessions with links to each speaker profile and links to the blog posts with summaries and videos.

Plenary Sessions:

Concurrent Sessions:

SEC Priorities in 2013 and Beyond

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While the government remains shutdown, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) remains open, and Chairman Mary Jo White opened the final day of the National Association of Corporate Directors Board Leadership Conference with an overview of what the commission has been focused on and where its attention will be directed in 2014.

As a former director who served on an audit committee, White understands the weight of the responsibilities placed on the shoulders of boards—particularly surrounding disclosure requirements. While the core purpose of disclosure is to provide investors with relevant information they need to make informed voting decisions, over time the list of disclosures has grown and become more specific, causing some to raise flags about disclosure becoming too intricate. “I’m not suggesting investors haven’t benefitted from this information—much, if not all, of it could be relevant and necessary, even though some insist investors don’t take advantage of it,” White said. “I am asking if investors need and are served by the detailed disclosures companies currently provide to the SEC. It can lead to info overload.”

Methods of improving disclosure are perennial topics, and White says there is still more to be done from her perspective. “But before we can move to improvements, we need to know why we have the information we have in disclosure today,” White explained, noting that the JOBS Act requires the SEC to review current disclosure requirements and consider how to modernize and simplify them for emerging growth companies. She said the staff is finalizing these rules and expects to make them public soon.

White also noted that some disclosure requirements may be past their prime. “Some requirements that were appropriate in the past may not reflect how investors use this information today,” she said, using the example of when annual reports were what investors looked to for historical closing prices and now this information is available almost immediately online.

“While much of what some term the ‘disclosure overload’ is a result of regulation, there are other sources,” White said. Due to investor demand, some companies made the decision to disclose more information than required to reduce risk of litigation claims of insufficient disclosure. “We think these additional disclosures are a good thing, but we should be careful not to have too much of a good thing,” White said.

Michael Woodford: CEO Turned Whistleblower

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Today marked an anniversary for former Olympus Corp. President and CEO Michael Woodford: the day he was fired from the camera and medical products manufacturer. What brought him to that day is a series of events that kicked off when Woodford had no choice but to blow the whistle on his own company after discovering a serious fraud.

Before being asked to assume the role of president–which he very gladly accepted–Woodford had a 30-year career at Olympus. Nevertheless, he knew that he wanted to make changes within the company, and soon into his presidency, an article in a business magazine titled Facta, ran an article about odd acquisitions Olympus had made and the high fees it paid a management consultancy.

When Woodford raised the issue with two managers in Japan about the article, he was told that CEO Tsuyoshi Kikukawa had advised them not to bring it up to Woodford. After demanding to speak to Kikukawa and Executive Vice President Hisashi Mori about the questionable acquisitions, Mori told Woodford that he worked for Kikukawa and that he was loyal to him.

Seeing no other option to raise the issue, Woodford wrote letters to the Olympus board and management and copied their auditor, Ernst & Young, on two of the letters. Instead of addressing the issue of the dubious acquisitions, the board unanimously ousted Woodford.

For more on the Olympus fraud, read an NACD Directorship magazine interview with Woodford from the March/April issue: http://www.directorship.com/exposing-fraud-at-any-cost/.