Category: The Digital Director

Building a Cybersecurity Talent Pipeline

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While prominent companies and healthcare institutions around the world were reacting to a ransomware attack known as WanaCryptor 2.0, or WannaCry, a young man working for a cybersecurity firm in southeast England landed on a solution that cost just $10.69. He found the so-called “kill switch” in the malware’s code that involved the simple purchase of an unregistered domain name. He promptly registered the domain, halting WannaCry’s spread. The identity of this cyberknight remains anonymous, but one notable fact about his background has emerged: he’s only 22 years old.

According to a 2015 study by the Center for Cyber Safety and Education, the average age of security practitioners is 45 years old. Many security professionals will leave the workforce within the next 20 years, but younger professionals are not seeking careers in cybersecurity at a pace sufficient to keep up with companies’ demands. Developing a workforce that will be prepared to meet companies’ increasingly complex cybersecurity needs means companies—and educators—will need to build a bigger, more inclusive talent pipeline for people interested in the practice.

Summer Fowler

Summer Fowler

When I spoke with cybersecurity expert Summer C. Fowler for the cover story of the May/June 2017 issue of NACD Directorship magazine, I asked about her work at Carnegie Mellon University to recruit diverse candidates to the programs she leads at the CERT Division of the Software Engineering Institute. One look at her Twitter profile illustrates that she’s a passionate supporter of the Cyburgh, PA Initiative, a program developed in partnership between Carnegie Mellon and the Pittsburgh Technology Council to advance the city’s status as a leader in cybersecurity technology. The initiative could not be successful without being inclusive.

“The issue of building a talent pipeline is such a challenge because of what we’re offering by way of schooling,” Fowler said about the role of university-level education in developing the cybersecurity talent pipeline. She then drew a parallel between the education and training of doctors in the 1970s to the challenges the cybersecurity sector has with finding diverse candidates. “When you look back to the early 1970s, the medical field was exactly the same. Only about 11 percent of doctors were women. There also were not many minority doctors in this country. We’re investigating what changes in the medical community were made to bring in more women and underrepresented minorities, so that we can do the exact same thing with computer science and engineering fields.”

Fowler pointed out that there needs to be further delineation of roles in the cybersecurity industry to clarify the hierarchy of talent desired. “When we talk about cybersecurity, we all think about a Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon or from Stanford,” Fowler said. “We need to get better at differentiating the roles and what training requirements are. When we get there, I think that striation of roles will naturally open a pipeline to more people who are interested in the field because it would be seen as this daunting job that requires a Ph.D.”

Still another challenge exists: getting diverse talent interested in the topic to begin with. I shared with Fowler an anecdote from my own high school experience. My path diverged from that of a male friend who was interested in white-hat hacking, which is the technology industry term for the benevolent hacking of systems to detect vulnerabilities. While I was curious about the world of professionals who were defending against cyberattacks, I had no outlet for learning about programming at the time. No one at my public high school in inner-city Memphis was engaging young women in learning about computer science in 2004, and my friend had family who supported and encouraged his interest.

Fast forward nearly 13 years later, and my friend is a practicing white-hat hacker for a Fortune 500 company. I, on the other hand, earned my bachelor’s degree in creative writing, and have since revived my interest in the topic and write about it from a governance perspective. Could I have been working at the same company with the helpful nudges of invested educators, or with after school programs for young women like Girls Who Code that are sponsored by interested corporations? Fowler seems to think the answer is “yes.”

She suggests that the solution now will not be to bring girls and young women to technology, but to bring discussions of technology to them within contexts that interest them. “Instead of saying to girls, ‘You need to belong to the computer science club,’ talk to them about what computer science might mean to ballet, or to whatever program they’re involved in.” She suggested discussing breaches to the entertainment industry with young people interested in acting or movies, for instance, as a way to pique their interest in a field they might not have considered before.

Ultimately, one of the greatest challenges to building the cybersecurity pipeline will involve developing aptitude tests, then encouraging promising young people to pursue a career down that pipeline. “It’s also a matter of figuring out what the specific competencies are. We’ve done a really good job for lots of different types of jobs at being able to say, ‘Let’s perform an assessment to see what your skills are and what you’d like to be doing.’ That process enables us to say, ‘Wow, you would make a great attorney, or you would make a really good financial analyst.’ We don’t have that in the realm of cybersecurity.

Building out more roles in cybersecurity and advocating for the inclusion of the role into other career aptitude tests would help young people—and perhaps even more women—to get excited to join the ranks of cyberkinghts in the future.


Katie Swafford is assistant editor of NACD Directorship magazine and also serves as editor of NACD’s Board Leaders’ Blog.

Click here to learn more about NACD’s online cyber-risk oversight program for directors.

Would Your Board Pass This Cyber-Risk Oversight Test?

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Ridge_Tom

Gov. Tom Ridge

“If you had to sign a cybersecurity certification similar to the financial reporting requirements for corporate officers under Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Section 302, could you do it?”

As my firm counsels boards and C-suite executives on cyber risk, we often begin by framing our conversation with that provocative question. How directors answer will indicate how confident they are in the cybersecurity posture of their business.

As an exercise, let’s review SOX Section 302. For the purposes of this discussion I have replaced the finance-related text with cybersecurity-specific language. These changes are bolded, and other elements that are critical SOX measures for proper oversight by officers and the board are underlined.

SEC. 302. CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY FOR CYBERSECURITY REPORTS.

(a) REGULATIONS REQUIRED.—The Commission shall, by rule, require, for each company filing periodic reports under section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78m,78o(d)), that the principal executive officer or officers and the principal cybersecurity officer or officers, or persons performing similar functions, certify in each annual or quarterly report filed or submitted under either such section of such Act that— 

(1) the signing officer has reviewed the report; 

(2) based on the officer’s knowledge, the report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary in order to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading; 

(3) based on such officer’s knowledge, the cybersecurity statements, and other cybersecurity information included in the report, fairly present in all material respects the cybersecurity condition and results of operations of the issuer as of, and for, the periods presented in the report;

(4) the signing officers—

(A) are responsible for establishing and maintaining internal controls;

(B) have designed such internal controls to ensure that material information relating to the issuer and its consolidated subsidiaries is made known to such officers by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which the periodic reports are being prepared;

(C) have evaluated the effectiveness of the issuer’s internal controls as of a date within 90 days prior to the report; and

(D) have presented in the report their conclusions about the effectiveness of their internal controls based on their evaluation as of that date;

(5) the signing officers have disclosed to the issuer’s auditors and the audit committee of the board of directors (or persons fulfilling the equivalent function)—

(A) all significant deficiencies in the design or operation of internal controls which could adversely affect the issuer’s ability to record, process, summarize, and report cybersecurity data and have identified for the issuer’s auditors any material weaknesses in internal controls; and

(B) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the issuer’s internal controls; and 

(6) the signing officers have indicated in the report whether or not there were significant changes in internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect internal controls subsequent to the date of their evaluation, including any corrective actions with regard to significant deficiencies and material weaknesses. 

Now, how confident are you in the state of your cyberposture? Fortunately, to use the old exercise phrase, “this has been only a drill.”

However, multiple federal regulators, including the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, and state agencies such as the New York Department of Financial Services, have become far more aggressive in holding corporate officers and board members accountable for cybersecurity oversight. And it is not out of the question that SOX-like requirements may materialize in the future, should another series of damaging breaches occur impacting consumers.

Regardless of whether regulators may soon require such specific attestations, significant discomfort with these questions at the board and C-suite level can indicate that cybersecurity is not being managed as an enterprise, twenty-first century business imperative. With sensitive customer information, employee data, operational processes, intellectual property, and trade secrets all on your networks, cybersecurity represents a real business and reputation risk.

The truth is that most corporate boards aren’t prepared for cyberattacks. It is an esoteric topic that remains elusive to most corporate directors.

NACD has been leading on this issue to ensure that its members have the resources to get up to speed, increase their cyberliteracy, and enhance cybersecurity oversight. I am proud that my firm has been able to partner with them to create an online education program specifically for corporate directors that leverages resources such as the NACD Cyber-Risk Oversight Handbook and the expertise of the CERT Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

While no program or technology can guarantee that your organization will not be hit by a cyberattack, it is incumbent upon us all to learn what we need to know to ask the right questions and to close as many gaps as possible. As the regulatory environment continues to focus on our ability to provide effective oversight, doing nothing is a sure-fire way to find cyberthieves in your system as well as regulators, litigators, shareholders, and customers knocking on the boardroom door. 

Tom Ridge is chair of Ridge Global, a risk management and cybersecurity advisory firm. An experienced corporate board member, he previously served as the first U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security and as the 43rd Governor of Pennsylvania.

Click here for more information on NACD’s cyber-risk oversight course.

Elevating Board Oversight of Cyber Risk

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Jim DeLoach

Jim DeLoach

Cyber risk, which is among the top five risks for organizations across many industries, presents a moving target. As innovative information technology (IT) transformation initiatives expand the digital footprint, they outpace the security protections companies have in place. Security and privacy internal control structures that reduce risk to an acceptable level today will inevitably become inadequate in the future—and even sooner than many may realize.

As companies continue the battle to protect their resources, boards remain concerned with the security and availability of information systems and the protection of confidential, sensitive data. Many executives think their risk tolerance is low, yet act as though it is relatively high, thus necessitating board engagement with cybersecurity.

Our research indicates that board engagement in information security matters is improving. In the spirit of further improvement, following are eight business realities directors should consider as they oversee cybersecurity risk.

1. The organization must be prepared for success. Managing cybersecurity is not just about managing the risk of bad things happening—it’s also about handling the upside of a company’s successful digital initiatives. As companies harvest new sources of value through digitization and business model innovation, the wise course is to plan for incredible success. Directors should ensure that the organization’s cybersecurity systems are resilient enough to handle that success.

2. It is highly probable that the company is already breached and doesn’t know it. The old thinking of “it’s not a matter of if a cyber risk event might occur, but more a matter of when” is dated. It’s happening—now. Boards should be concerned about the duration of significant breaches before they are finally detected.

Our experience is that detective and monitoring controls remain immature across most industries, resulting in continued failure to detect breaches in a timely manner. Tabletop exercises alone are not sufficient to address the increasing sophistication of perpetrators. Simulations of likely attack activity should be performed periodically to ensure that defenses accurately detect breaches and that responses are timely. Boards should focus on the adequacy of the company’s playbook for responding, recovering, and resuming normal business operations after an incident. The playbook should also include responses to customers and employees to minimize reputation damage that could occur in a breach’s wake.

3. The board should focus on adverse business outcomes that must be managed. While most businesses know what their crown jewels are, they forget to focus on the business outcomes they are looking to manage when they assess security. Considering risk outcomes or scenarios leads to enterprise security solutions that are more comprehensive than those developed around specific assets and systems.

For example, if an application is deemed to be key for business processes and is exposed to sensitive data leakage, the security solution is often focused on the source application and implementation of generic security controls. But the risk of an adverse outcome extends beyond the technology perimeter. Employee users have access to data, regularly download it, and might even e-mail it, either ignoring or forgetting the business imperative to protect it. Therefore, controls over what happens to critical data assets once downloaded cannot be ignored. IT leaders must look at information security risks holistically and consider user leakage an integral part of the adverse outcomes to be managed.

4. Cyberthreats are constantly evolving. Because the nature and severity of threats in the cybersecurity environment change incessantly, protection measures must evolve to remain ahead of the threat profile. Boards should inquire as to how the organization’s existing threat management program proactively identifies and responds to new threats to cybersecurity, taking into consideration the company’s crown jewels, the business outcomes it wishes to avoid, the nature of its industry and business model, and its visibility as a potential target. Directors should also insist on an assessment of the related risks resulting from major systems changes.

5. Cybersecurity is like a game of chess, so play it that way. IT security organizations must be steps ahead of adversaries, waiting and ready with an arsenal of technology, people, processes, and prowess. The old game of sole reliance on technology to deliver an effective and sustainable security monitoring solution falls short when combating the ever-changing threats to businesses. Security functions need to change the way they deliver protective services and move far beyond initiatives to create enterprise-wide awareness of cyber risk. Accordingly, boards should expect:

– A clear articulation of the current cyber risks facing all aspects of the business;

– A summary of recent cybersecurity incidents, how they were handled, and lessons learned;

– A short-term and long-term road map outlining how the company will continue to evolve its cybersecurity capabilities to address new and expanded threats, including the related accountabilities in place to ensure progress; and

– Meaningful metrics that provide supporting key performance and risk indicators of successful management of top-priority cyber risks.

6. Cybersecurity must extend beyond the four walls. Notable gaps in knowledge of vendors’ data security management programs and procedures currently exist between top-performing organizations and other companies—particularly in areas that might stand between an organization’s crown jewels and cyberattackers. As companies look upstream to vendors and suppliers (including second tier and third tier), and downstream to channel partners and customers, they are likely to find sources of vulnerability. Directors should expect management to collaborate with third parties to address cyber risk in a cost-effective manner across the value chain. Attention should be paid to assessing insider risk because electronic connectivity and use of cloud-based storage and external data management obfuscates the notion of who constitutes an “insider.”

7. Cybersecurity issues cannot dominate the IT budget. Over the past decade, IT departments have been reducing operations and maintenance costs consistently, funneling those savings to fund other priorities like security. Taking into account other priorities, including compliance and system enhancements, Protiviti’s research indicates that mature businesses are left with only 13 percent of their IT budgets for innovation.

With a strained budget, it becomes critical for IT leaders to target protection investments on the business outcomes that can adversely impact the organization’s crown jewels, understand the changing threat landscape and risk tolerances, and prepare for the inevitable incidents. Without this discipline, cybersecurity will continue to consume larger portions of the IT budget. Innovation will then suffer, and the business could ultimately fail—not because a severe threat is realized, but because the spend on operational risk has distracted the business from the strategic risk of failing to mount a competitive response to new entrants and innovators. Therefore, as important as the imperative for sound cybersecurity practices is, directors should not allow it to stifle innovation.

8. Directors should gauge their confidence in the advice they’re receiving. While there is no one-size-fits-all solution, boards should periodically assess the sufficiency of the expertise they rely on for cybersecurity matters. There may be circumstances where the board should strongly consider adding individuals with technology experience either as members of the board or as advisers to the board.

Cyber risks are impossible to eliminate, resources are finite, risk profiles are ever-changing, and getting close to secure is elusive. Boards of directors need to ensure the organizations they serve are undertaking focused, targeted efforts to improve their cybersecurity capabilities continuously in the face of ever-changing threats.


Jim DeLoach is managing director of Protiviti.