Category: Technology

What if Corporate Boards Acted Like Google?

Published by

By Julie Garland McLellan*

Garland McLellan

Julie Garland McLellan

Jeff Jarvis’ latest book ‘What Would Google Do’ envisions the ways in which running businesses the way Google is run would change industries. It is impossible to read this book without having a few innovative ideas of your own. It got me thinking ‘What would Google do if they regulated boards or designed corporate governance systems?’

Here are some ideas:

Give shareholders control – in theory this happens at annual general meetings (AGMs). In practice the process stultifies the content and the exercise is often an empty formality. The AGM could be webcast and votes cast remotely after hearing the arguments for and against each issue. Chat rooms could allow shareholders to communicate with each other and the board on issues.

Life is a beta test – instinctively, when we make mistakes, we feel embarrassed. We shouldn’t.  A board that truly values innovation or creativity should be out pushing the boundaries of what is possible and failing a little from time to time.

Don’t be evil – Google’s founders wrote, before their IPO, “We believe strongly that in the long term, we will be better served – as shareholders and in all other ways – by a company that does good things for the world even if we forego some short term gains.” Wow!

Elegant organisation of data – When you type a search into Google you get back a simple list of relevant sources of the information sought. There is no clutter, no distracting graphic, and the sources are ranked in order of likely importance. Why aren’t board papers presented like that? Why don’t corporate boards report to their shareholders like that?

Meritocracy wins – In boardrooms, it is often the sad case that directors are selected because of what they have done in the past and with insufficient real analysis of what they will provide to the board in the future. On Google data is realtime; imagine if we could constitute boards that had access to the best expertise on any topic, instantly, as required. How would that affect quality of data, independence of thought and speed of reaction?

Better searching of previous information – With Google a board could call up such board governance data instantly and use it to support decisions. A system for tracking and reporting dividends and share purchases or sales when annual tax returns are being drawn up would remove the potential for errors and inaccurate reporting of dates, quantities and assessable imposts. Shareholders do not want impersonal reports that are delivered months after the end of the financial year; companies can close of their accounts faster and shareholders expect faster reporting with greater customisation.

The impact of the Google mentality upon regulators and judiciary is also apparent; these institutions are using sophisticated search and tracking to catch inconsistencies in reporting and recording data. The ability to cross check and match large data sets will change the corporate compliance and reporting environment.

Love it or loathe it, the ‘Googlisation’ of corporate boardrooms will have an effect on directors that may be as profound as the effect of globalisation of business.

Julie Garland McLellan is a practising company director with experience on a range of boards including public listed, non-profit and government sector organisations. She is also a boardroom consultant and the author of Dilemmas, Dilemmas, a book of practical case studies for company directors. Julie will be presenting at the NACD conference in Washington on the topic of “Digital Directorship”.

Register to the NACD Conference, 2010

Register Today

Meet My Hundreds of “Friends”: They Could Be Your Future

Published by

My nephew, a marketing and business undergraduate in the UK, recently applied for a summer internship with a large soft drinks manufacturer. He got the interview but was alarmed to be asked this question: “Do you have a Facebook fan page [learn more] with more than five hundred people signed up?” He has a Facebook page, and many friends, but he hasn’t attempted to create a fan site—and that counted against him.

The company, of course, wanted access to large groups of twenty-somethings so they could push their products to their target market at the touch of a button. Joe is as addicted to texting and tweeting as any young adult, but, when it mattered, his lack of social media savvy cost him a job opportunity. Be sure the same thing doesn’t happen to you in your board career.

Neil Braun, a corporate board member of NACD, director of IMAX, and newly appointed dean of the Lubin School of Business at Pace University, believes that digital media expertise is now an essential board competency, especially for directors who sit on the boards of consumer products companies. (Here’s a quick look at why B2Bs & B2Cs use social media.)

Neil believes that good directors add value to the company by truly understanding the industry and what customers want. “It goes way beyond Twitter or Facebook,” he says. “Your customers can make or break your company by using Yelp or Foursquare to damn you—or attract a giant crowd.”

Neil’s contention is that risk governance isn’t possible without acute social media awareness—and that directors cannot be a strategic asset to their companies unless they “get it.”

NACD is looking for tweeting, blogging and yelping directors to take part in a panel discussion at this year’s NACD Corporate Governance Conference.

Email me if you are interested in joining us. Dinosaurs need not apply; and please, no snail mail. For the really social-media savvy, tweet me at @NACD.