Category: Inside NACD

NACD Introduces New Director Credential and Recognizes Its First Class of Board Leadership Fellows

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In today’s complex business world, there’s a growing need for well-rounded directors who stay informed on emerging issues and leading practices. Unlike doctors and lawyers, directors do not have a formal certification program. They must find resources, mentors and peers on their own to help them stay up to speed.

The need for this kind of peer-to-peer director education led the National Association of Corporate Directors to create a specialized course of study, the NACD Board Leadership Program. NACD’s new director credential enables directors to not only demonstrate their dedication and commitment to boardroom excellence, but also to showcase the highest standards of director professionalism and anticipate the unknown by learning from experienced, world-class board leaders.

To become an NACD Board Leadership Fellow, participants must be experienced company directors, complete The Master Class and then complete at least 10 more credits of NACD education within 12 months. Participants are required to take a number of formal, skill-specific learning electives to hone their committee skills, keep their knowledge of board function and purpose up-to-date, and prepare them to offer a 360-degree vision to shareowners, companies and their board colleagues.

After completion of the program, fellows must complete at least 10 credits of NACD director education every year to maintain their status as NACD Board Leadership Fellows.

The first 16 NACD Board Leadership Fellows were recognized at a dinner in New York City in May. Collectively, this elite group represents boards of more than 60 companies and provides a snapshot of the caliber of directors engaged in continuous learning with America’s premier membership organization for board members:

“As a director in today’s rapidly changing corporate environment, board leadership requires keeping current, fresh and, above all, relevant,” said Michael Pocalyko, one of the new NACD Board Leadership Fellows. “NACD events are among the only places where I can speak with my peers frankly, confidentially and unimpeded. By participating in the full range of NACD director education and becoming a Board Leadership Fellow, I get early intelligence on emerging issues—so my boards can engage these issues as opportunities instead of reacting to them as challenges. These advantages not only ground me as a director, but ultimately benefit the companies and the shareholders I serve.”

Directors who are interested in becoming an NACD Board Leadership Fellow can contact NACD’s registrar at 202-572-2088 or email Fellowships@NACDonline.org.

For information about the NACD Board Leadership Fellowship program, please visit http://www.nacdonline.org/Education/content.cfm?ItemNumber=3577&navItemNumber=3704.

Director Confidence Falters in Q2

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Confidence in the economy is a broad topic to discuss. Just as one area starts to show positive growth, the world is shaken by a different downturn or disaster. In an article last month in the New York Times, economist Paul Krugman discussed the increased complexity of the current economy, compared to the months following the most recent financial crisis. In late 2008, the world’s collective attention was on the falling stock market. Today, there are many areas contributing to overall economic confidence: inflation, employment, oil prices and so forth. As Krugman notes, “we’re living in a world that is characterized not so much by the sum of all fears as by some of all fears.”

NACD’s most recent Board Confidence Index (BCI) reflects this conflicted view. In Q2 2011, the Index fell from 64.9 to 63.1, the first time it has dropped since its creation in the autumn of 2010. When asked to characterize the current state of the economy compared to one year ago, directors registered a confidence index of 68, a decrease of five full points since Q1 2011. Directors also feel less confident in the progress made in the short run—looking at changes in conditions over the past quarter, confidence dropped to 59 from 61.

However, the slight decline in confidence is countered with a more optimistic view for the coming months. Just this week, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke projected increased growth for the next six months in remarks following the Central Bank’s Beige Book release. According to Bernanke, policymakers will be focused on the labor markets. According to the Q2 2011 BCI, the boardroom agrees. Despite slowed growth, nearly half of corporate directors (43%) plan to expand the workforce in the upcoming quarter. In addition to hiring practices, directors are generally more confident regarding the future. Expectations for the next year stand at an assured 67.

Recently released data from The Conference Board (TCB) echoes the caution seen in the boardroom. Despite higher predictions, TCB’s Consumer Confidence Index fell to 60.8 from a revised 66 in April. Unsurprisingly, American consumers are troubled by the current combination of increased costs for food, the increased cost of oil and the depressed real estate market.

The Board Confidence Index is conducted by NACD in conjunction with Heidrick & Struggles and Pearl Meyer & Partners. Q3 2011 results can be expected in September.

NACD Announces Blue Ribbon Commissioners for Lead Director Report

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An elite group of more than 20 corporate directors and corporate governance thought-leaders have begun work on the 2011 Report of the NACD Blue Ribbon Commission on the Effective Lead Director, led by co-chairs Barbara Hackman Franklin, former U.S. Secretary of Commerce , director of Aetna and Dow Chemical Company and chairman of the board for NACD, and Irvine Hockaday, director for Ford Motor Company, Estée Lauder and Crown Media Holdings.

Lead directors play a significant role in the boardroom, enhancing board effectiveness by acting as independent figures in communicating the needs between the company’s management and board. Five years ago, only 39 percent of boards had lead directors. That number has almost doubled. Today, 66 percent of boards have a lead director.

NACD broadly defined the duties of the lead director in a 2004 Blue Ribbon Commission Report. Leveraging their years of experience, the NACD Blue Ribbon Commissioners will clarify the role of the lead director in order to enhance the effectiveness of the lead director in the boardroom. The 2011 report will expand the earlier recommendations by exploring how the lead director role can be used to the fullest extent. Specifically, the report will discuss the evolving roles and responsibilities of the lead director; the ideal profile of a lead director; and key relationships and communications of the lead director, including those between management and shareholders. The report will also offer recommendations for future challenges facing the role.

The 2011 Commissioners who contribute their views to the report are directors from leading companies and corporate governance experts. In addition to co-chairs Barbara Hackman Franklin and Irvine Hockaday, the panel includes:

Holly Gregory, corporate partner at Weil, Gotshal & Manges, will also serve as governance counsel to the Commission.

The 2011 Report of the NACD Blue Ribbon Commission on the Lead Director is scheduled for release at the NACD Annual Board Leadership Conference, October 2-4, 2011, in Washington, DC.