SEC Roundtable on Conflict Minerals Regulations

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On Tuesday, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) convened a roundtable for an area the Commission does not usually delve into: the humanitarian crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). As part of the Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation, the SEC was given the responsibility of drafting rules requiring publicly listed companies to disclose whether their products contain “conflict minerals.” In this context, the conflict minerals are tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold produced in the DRC or adjoining countries, as well as any others the U.S. Secretary of State may designate as financing conflict in the DRC.

Although the SEC issued proposed rules on the disclosure in December 2010, it has since failed to meet its April deadline established for final rules, citing difficulties in drafting a rule that would not pose prohibitive costs of compliance for companies. To this end, the SEC convened a public roundtable representing corporations, investors and human rights advocates.

The first panel discussed what is covered by the rule, and what steps would be required to comply. Panelists included Sandy Merber, General Electric; Irma Villarreal, Kraft Foods Inc.; Yedwa Zandile Simelane, AngloGold Ashanti Ltd.; and Mike Davis, Global Witness. The panel discussed a series of questions the Commission had developed from the first round of comment letters including:

  • Should functionality be a test of whether a product is included in the report?
  • If the mineral is used as an ornament, should it be included?
  • Should rules include a de minimis point?
  • How to define “contract to manufacture” in rules

Unlike many of the rules to develop from Dodd-Frank, this did not trigger contention among those representing corporations, investors and advocacy groups. While the representatives from Kraft Foods and General Electric noted the practical impossibility of fully identifying the sources of all their products by the next reporting season, the other panelists, recognizing this, responded that they would be content with a “good faith” effort, improving year over year. Even so, the sheer scope of the rule’s potential impact demonstrates the difficulties the SEC faces in writing the rules, and for companies to comply. Villarreal noted that Kraft Foods has 40,000 different products with 100,000 suppliers.

The second panel continued to discuss the steps necessary for compliance as well as reporting. Panelists included Benedict S. Cohen, The Boeing Company; Jennifer Prisco, TE Connectivity; Darren Fenwick, Enough Project; Kay Nimmo, ITRI, Ltd.; and Darrel Schubert, Ernst & Young LLP and the Auditing Standards Board. Picking up where the first panel left off, the roundtable discussed further questions from the SEC, such as:

  • Should the disclosure be included in the annual report or in a separate report?
  • Should scrap and recycled minerals be exempt?
  • How should the country of origin be defined?
  • Who should conduct the audit? A Certified Public Accountant (CPA), or non-CPA?
  • Should the SEC specify a standard for the audit, and, if so, what standard?

The SEC faces a difficult task—draft rules that satisfy the Dodd-Frank requirements and advocacy groups, without imposing punitive costs or unattainable expectations on corporations. In light of the recent dismissal of proxy access rules from the U.S. Court of Appeals, the SEC must also create rules that will survive potential court challenges. As the voice of the director, NACD is currently drafting a comment letter. Stay posted for further developments in this area.

2 Comments

  • Ben king says:

    Conflict minerals and how they are obtained have been an issue for years. Human right should always be at the forefront of any organization. There should be a ban on conflict minerals. Are conflict minerals that much cheaper that the companies have to use them? If they choose to use the conflict minerals why should the SEC worry about the cost of the companies having to conform? I will gladly pay more for a product that is made with respect to humanity.