Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Keynote: Hon. Olympia J. Snowe

October 14th, 2013 | By

NACD Chairman Emerita Barbara Hackman Franklin introduced the first keynote speaker of the day: former Sen. Olympia J. Snowe (R-ME), who is also a director of T. Rowe Price Group Inc. and Bipartisan Policy Center. With the government shutdown continuing, Snowe offered an insider’s perspective of what’s causing the lack of bipartisanship in Congress and the likelihood of Congress and the president reaching agreement on long-term fiscal and regulatory issues.

Snowe has first-hand experience in navigating a government shutdown in Congress—her first year in the Senate was 1995 when the last shutdown occurred. She noted that during that time a bipartisan coalition of senators convened to come up with a balanced budget. “We had to show we could collaborate,” Snowe explained.

The culture of collaboration appears to be moving slowly in the current Congress. Divides over entitlements, spending, debts, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have all contributed to the government stalemate. “It’s mind-boggling that Congress would cost this country $300 million in terms of economic output with this shutdown,” Snowe said. “It creates an atmosphere of uncertainty.”

Growth of Partisanship

Why is it so difficult to achieve bipartisan harmony? Snowe notes that part of this is because red states keep getting redder and blue states keep getting bluer. “There is no incentive to working across the aisle because of the risk of being opposed in primary elections,” she said. “We are more polarized in this moment than we have been in 134 years.”

While many may have hoped that recent past events, such as the fiscal cliff and the debt-ceiling crisis of 2011, would have been lessons learned to prevent Congress from dragging America through another economic upheaval, it doesn’t appear to be the case. “The Democrats and the Republicans are like two ships passing in the night—one in the Atlantic and one in the Pacific,” Snowe said.

Ending the Stalemate

Snow said attaching the ACA to government operations is not achievable nor is it a winning strategy. She said the key is to reopen government and pass the debt-ceiling increase. “It’s astonishing that some members of Congress truly believe defaulting on our credit as a country wouldn’t roil the markets,” Snowe noted.

She suggested that open communications among leaders will be significant. “This is a transcendent moment for our country,” she explained. “Congress and the president must communicate; they can’t operate in parallel universes.”

But communication among government leaders is just one piece of the conversation. Directors—and the public at-large—also have a duty to speak up. Snowe suggested utilizing social media and online technologies to communicate actively as one approach. “We have the responsibility to make sure Congress becomes the solution-driven powerhouse it once was using the same approach as our founding fathers: advancing decision making through consensus,” Snowe said. “We can’t afford to institutionalize this culture of winning at all costs.”

Succession and Sport

May 16th, 2013 | By

As reported in Directors Daily last week, Sir Alex Ferguson, manager of publicly traded Manchester United, announced his retirement. While the retirement of a sports figure, especially an English football (soccer) manager, would not normally provide fodder for an NACD blog post, Ferguson’s resignation underlies the need for succession planning and talent development, and serves as yet another warning about the risks of social media.

A soccer manager is often the most public face of the organization. Although not a traditional member of the C-suite, Ferguson’s relevance is illustrated by the announcement of his retirement. Within minutes of the open of trading following the resignation announcement, Manchester United’s stock price fell more than 5 percent. Directors, especially those who serve organizations where non-CEO employees maintain high levels of public visibility or influence, may want to look closely at Ferguson’s retirement as an example of a high-profile succession. While a coach of a sports franchise is a unique case, this succession plan looks to have been a long-term process resulting in unanimous board approval for the retiring manager’s recommended candidate.

The average tenure of a Fortune 500 CEO is 4.6 years[i], while the average tenure of a high-level English soccer manager is only 2.1 seasons. In a profession defined by short termism, Ferguson successfully managed his club for over 26 years, nearly 10 years longer than the next longest serving premier league manager. The Manchester United board allowed Ferguson to take the lead in the search for his own successor, and even allowed him to make the approach to the succession candidate. It is unusual for a board to cede so much control over the succession process. With directors serving for an average of nine years, their experience and longevity are essential to maintaining corporate continuity throughout the succession process. The board’s role in developing potential succession candidates is one aspect of executive talent development being explored by this year’s NACD Blue Ribbon Commission. The October release of the commission’s report will also examine the value of internal development, backed by a number of studies comparing internal and external succession.

The appointment of an outsider to the position of Manchester United manager was expected, but boards may wish to consider the value of recruiting internal candidates for CEO and other senior executive positions. Studies show that internally recruited CEOs deliver greater total financial performance and are more likely to retain the position[ii]. Also, senior executives hired from the outside have higher rates of failure than those internally promoted[iii], and organizations with greater reliance on external hires have twice the turnover as organizations that rely on internal promotions[iv]. While these studies point toward internal succession policies, boards may look outside when searching for fresh perspectives and thinking, or even contemplating a change in strategy. While Manchester United had been the world’s most valuable soccer club for many years, it fell to second in 2013. Could the appointment of an outside manager mean a change in strategy aimed at regaining the club’s title as the most valuable soccer team in the world?

While Manchester United’s transition process may appear successful, the announcement of Sir Alex Ferguson’s successor did not unfold as planned. There was no “the king is dead, long live the king” announcement; Manchester United announced the impending resignation but waited until the next day to name the future manager. In that short span of time, social media threw a snag in the carefully planned announcement. Prior to officially naming Ferguson’s successor, Manchester United mistakenly tweeted a link to its Facebook page that congratulated the new manager, David Moyes, on his appointment; the tweet and Facebook page were withdrawn within one minute. Moyes had been predicted as the successor, so the ill-timed social media announcement did not receive the same level of attention as other high-profile public company social media announcements. These events surrounding the succession announcement underscore risks posed by social media. In this case, it seems that human error, not a technological glitch, was the source of the problem, reinforcing the fact that while directors’ focus on IT risk is important, they can’t neglect old-fashioned human risk.

In a rare overlap of soccer and governance, Manchester United can provide directors with an example of a high-profile non-CEO succession that has received significant attention worldwide.

10 Reasons to Register Today for NACD’s Board Leadership Conference

April 30th, 2013 | By

For corporate directors, time is a valuable resource. As such, I’m frequently asked why directors should carve out three days to attend NACD’s annual Board Leadership Conference, which is held every October in the nation’s capital. To me, it is obvious why those in the boardroom should attend this first-rate conference.

Here are the 10 reasons I shared with our NACD chapter leaders at a recent meeting in St. Louis, Missouri:

  1. Save $500 when registering by April 30. The NACD Board Leadership Conference is historically sold out, and this three-day conference represents the most important knowledge exchange for the world’s leading directors, C-suite executives, and governance experts.
  2. For directors by directors. Learn from leading boardroom practitioners, those who have endured many hard lessons you may not want to encounter yourself! Hear firsthand from Laban Jackson, audit committee chair of JPMorgan Chase, about the London Whale controversy and his perspective on the board’s role in risk oversight. Learn more about the shifting landscape of social media from Clara Shih, Starbucks director and CEO of Hearsay. Get the latest on how big data is impacting business with Rich Relevance CEO David Sellinger.
  3. Get more actionable takeaways than from any other conference. Address persistent challenges and gain “next practices” from your peers on the timeliest and most critical boardroom issues, including human capital management, emerging technology, compensation, and global markets.
  4. Make your voice heard. Take part in shaping thought leadership and talk to influential legislators, regulators, and stakeholders.
  5. Sharpen your committee skills. Attend a Sunday Board Committee Forum, including dedicated sessions on audit, compensation, nominating/governance, and risk. Network with peers during breaks following big-name keynote speakers, and share your opinion with peer-led panels and committee chairs who really understand your challenges.
  6. Get hands-on with social media. Visit our first ever social media learning lab, staffed by experts in the latest social media trends, who can show you the ropes and help you understand how social medial is affecting your business.
  7. Spark innovative thinking. Participate in active dialogues around Directorship 2020—NACD’s new initiative—to explore how and why the boardroom will change over the next several years and what you as a director need to know to keep pace. Gain exclusive insights gleaned from thought leaders and directors around the country in a report from our Directorship 2020 regional events.
  8. Build your network. Exchange ideas with nearly 800 directors from around the world, including those from Akamai Technologies, Ford, JetBlue, JPMorgan Chase, and Union Pacific, to name a few.
  9. Strengthen your reputation. The most sought-after directors are well informed and well connected. Your participation at this event will earn you recognition for your commitment to continuous learning. For those who have completed the Master Class, this conference confers all the elective requirements you need to become an NACD Board Leadership Fellow.
  10. Tailor your experience. There’s something for everyone. Join special breakouts for general counsels, private company directors, small-cap directors, and nonprofits organizations. With nearly 50 sessions, choose from unmatched session selection to meet your own boardroom needs and interests.

In my opinion, NACD’s Board Leadership Conference is not only a great value, but an experience every corporate director should take part in.

I look forward to seeing you this October in Washington, D.C. Register here.