Posts Tagged ‘risk’

How Boards Can Strengthen the Risk Oversight Dialogue With Management

July 10th, 2014 | By

This spring, members of the NACD Advisory Council on Risk Oversight convened in Washington, D.C., to discuss how boards can strengthen their dialogue with management on risk oversight. Participants—including Michael Hofmann, the former chief risk officer of Koch Industries and current director of Calpine—shared experiences, lessons learned, and effective approaches for embedding risk in board-level strategy dialogue. From that discussion—detailed in the meeting’s Summary of Proceedings—delegates focused on these steps directors can take. They include:

  • Establish a clear definition of what “risk” means at the company: For management and the board to work together, they need to establish a shared definition of what risk means to the company.
  • Monitor the company-wide risk culture: Directors should ensure that the company has a culture that supports the discussion of risk throughout the entire organization and is seen as part of the company’s fabric.
  • Avoid the trap of false precision: Looking at only the expected return of a new business program or strategic move can restrict dialogue and lead to minimization of the potential downside.
  • Get out of the weeds by taking a deep dive: To help counteract the tendency of boards and management to focus on operational, regulatory, and financial reporting risks, many boards conduct an annual “deep dive” or “off-site” meeting. These meetings are dedicated to thinking about, understanding, and challenging assumptions of strategic moves and risks.

The Summary of Proceedings also investigates ways in which directors can and do incorporate these practices into their boards’ activities. NACD members can click here to access the full list of takeaways.

Leveraging the Risks and Rewards of Information Technology

May 8th, 2014 | By

As information technology (IT) continues to evolve, so do the oversight responsibilities of corporate directors. From big data analytics to social media to cybersecurity, technology creates opportunities for companies to innovate, to create operational efficiencies, and to develop a competitive advantage.

These potential rewards can bring significant risks, however. Directors have the task of ensuring technology is integrated into both company strategy and enterprise risk management—and to do so they must first gain a deeper understanding of how technology is impacting their businesses.

To help directors ensure they are prepared to leverage both the risks and rewards of IT, NACD developed an eight-part video series—The Intersection of Technology, Strategy, and Risk in partnership with KPMG and ISACA.

The series includes insights from leading technology experts and top executives from AT&T, Citigroup, Dunkin’ Brands, Kaiser Permanente, and  Oracle, among others, and focuses on critical IT areas for directors, such as:

  • how emerging technologies are altering the business landscape;
  • critical questions boards should be asking about technology;
  • the role of the CIO;
  • disruptive technologies;
  • fostering innovation;
  • balancing IT risks and opportunities;
  • cybersecurity; and
  • social media.

To complement the video series, NACD has additional resources, including white papers, articles, webinars, full transcripts of each video, and a discussion guide for directors who would like to take a deeper dive and bring these topics into their own boardrooms.

To watch The Intersection of Technology, Strategy, and Risk video series and access the supplemental resources, visit NACDonline.org/IT.

In Conversation with Laban Jackson

October 13th, 2013 | By

JPMorgan Chase & Co. has frequently made headlines since news of the London Whale broke. In a candid interview with Jeffrey M. Cunningham, managing director and senior advisor of the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD), Director and Audit Chairman Laban Jackson shares how the company is navigating current challenges and preparing for future ones.

The London Whale Investigation

Jackson noted that one of the root causes of the London Whale was tied to culture. “The culture totally broke down,” he explained. “The real culture at JPMorgan–or at any great company–is if you have a problem and you raise your hand, it becomes everyone’s problem. If you don’t raise your hand, it’s your problem.”

On CEO Jamie Dimon

“Jamie Dimon is the best manager I’ve ever seen, and I’m old,” Jackson said. “He has absolute integrity.” Jackson went on to note that Dimon is human and has flaws as every human being does.

“One thing to do as a director–and I didn’t learn this early enough–the first job you have is to get the CEO right. The second is to get the next CEO right,” Jackson explained. “But while you have that CEO, figure out his or her flaws and help them with them.”

Ramifications of the London Whale

The board fired five people and clawed back $100 million and cut the CFO and CEO salaries in half. “We wanted to get the respect back of the people at the company,” Jackson said.

When asked by the Council of Institutional Investors if JPMorgan had done enough, “We said well, we can’t shoot ‘em,” Jackson said.

Big Enough to Succeed?

In a business where the motto is often “go big or go home,” laws and regulation play key roles in ensuring companies are operating in an effective manner. Some regulations, however, may be difficult for companies that do not have the same scale as JPMorgan to comply with.

“We move trillions [of dollars] a day in and out of JPMorgan in 156 countries,” Jackson said. “I don’t know many companies that can do that. If big banks are broken up, I don’t know who can do this.”

Around the World

Jackson spends several weeks a year visiting JPMorgan offices across the globe and meeting with regulators. He notes that he has started meeting with up-and-coming JPMorgan employees: “I learn so much from them–it has been a wonderful thing for me.”