Posts Tagged ‘Nonprofit’

Small-Cap Boards: Challenges or Opportunities?

March 24th, 2014 | By

As NACD works with corporate directors of public, private, and nonprofit boards to oversee and ensure the long-term sustainability of the enterprise and bolster investor confidence, I am frequently asked: “What companies have the most significant challenges?” While unique challenges certainly exist across boards of all company types, many view the roles of small-cap public company boards to be quite challenging.

These unique challenges span time and effort (workload) requirements, compensation, talent, financing, regulation, risk, strategy, competition, and internal resources, just to name a few. Small-cap directors and governance professionals may identify and prioritize the unique challenges of these companies differently, however, but one thing remains constant and that is that small-cap companies represent the majority of companies listed on U.S. exchanges, and the long-term prosperity of these small-cap companies is essential to a growing, thriving economy.

So where can small-cap company directors turn to reinforce their strategic agility?

First, I suggest all directors read, and share with their director and C-suite colleagues, NACD’s Bridging Effectiveness Gaps: A Candid Look at Board Dynamics and NACD’s C-Suite Expectations white papers. These are both short, quick reads that can help create a constructive framework for meaningful dialogue.

Second, I highly recommend that all directors read NACD’s Board Building white paper, another high-impact, quick read. Most important in this resource is the skill set matrix enclosed in the appendix. Many companies are now using the skill set matrix to both determine and articulate the experiences and talents required for their future strategies.

Lastly, I suggest that current and aspiring small-cap directors attend NACD’s Small-Cap Forum on April 10 in San Antonio or on July 17 in San Francisco. Both sessions will focus on current and emerging issues facing small-cap boards, and these interactive events will include a range of interactive, peer-to-peer networking opportunities for robust dialogue.

Contact me at hstoever@NACDonline.org if you have specific questions or suggestions on how NACD can assist you, your board, and other small-cap directors advance exemplary board leadership.

Help Us Help You

May 30th, 2013 | By

Fact: we live in a world of data. Today, nearly every strategic decision is fortified by metrics and dashboards, analyzing the projected outcome to the smallest degree. This is equally true at NACD, where our annual governance surveys—public, private, and nonprofit—underlie nearly every aspect of the organization’s activity. From publications and presentations, to peer exchanges, and our annual Board Leadership Conference, data collected from the thousands of respondents informs the sessions, forums, topics, and future events. Beyond the boardroom, the trends, statistics, and perspectives captured in these surveys provide those in the C-suite, investors, and stakeholders with crucial information on the current state of corporate governance in the United States.

In the regulatory sphere, we use survey data to inform our comment letters and in-person testimony on behalf of boardrooms to regulators and lawmakers. For instance, survey responses from NACD’s membership strengthened CEO Ken Daly’s comments to the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) regarding proposed mandatory audit firm rotation, and the recommended alternative of a widely supported rigorous evaluation process. The PCAOB’s initiative on audit firm rotation is now “paused.”

NACD’s three annual governance surveys can help fuel your board’s process in benchmarking with respect to peers and leading practices. Whether you use a general report, or commission an NACD Custom Benchmarking Report, data broken down by industry, size, or both serves as an excellent starting point for boardroom discussions.

NACD is dedicated to providing directors with timely and pertinent content, but we need your input. As a thank you for participating in these surveys, NACD will send each participant a free electronic copy of the final report for each survey he or she takes. In fact, each survey respondent is entered to win a one-year NACD Individual Director Membership, or an opportunity to extend NACD membership. We thank you in advance for your participation.

What a Difference Three Years Makes

February 14th, 2013 | By

The state of the economy was remarkably different the last time NACD issued a governance survey dedicated to nonprofit organizations. In 2009, companies were just starting to stage a recovery from the financial crisis, and action plans were in the formative stages. At that point, survey respondents indicated the areas of most critical importance to their board were “board leadership,” “ethics and social responsibility,” and “board effectiveness.”

Fast forward three years to the 2012–2013 NACD Nonprofit Governance Survey, which shows that nonprofit boards have altered structures to meet the economic climate. Across the board, nonprofits have shifted focus to areas directly related to performance and strategy. Today, survey respondents indicate the priority governance issues are those that drive results: “strategic planning and oversight,” “fundraising,” and “financial oversight/internal controls.”

In addition to a more performance-driven outlook, nonprofit organizations have also increased the number of diverse directors present in the boardroom. According to NACD’s 2012 Blue Ribbon Commission on the Diverse Board, this development is a logical step, as boardroom diversity is a business issue: a means to competitiveness. Nonprofits are therefore more than competitive—female representation is ubiquitous with 97.7 percent of respondents reporting at least one female director on their board. The percentage of boards with at least one minority director has increased nearly 20 percent since 2009 to 76.4 percent.

Nonprofit organizations are ahead of their public and private company peers with respect to boardroom diversity. For public companies, diversity is a focus of pension funds and other institutions, as noted in last week’s NACD Directors Daily. Groups such as the Thirty Percent Coalition are urging Russell 1000 companies to increase gender equality on boards specifically—setting a goal that 30 percent of board seats are held by women by 2015. To meet this, U.S. public companies would need to work fast—current reports estimate that just 12 to 16 percent of board seats are currently held by women. Furthermore, according to NACD’s 2012–2013 Public Company Governance Survey, 27.4 percent of boards have zero female directors.

For more information about the 2012–2013 NACD Nonprofit Governance Survey, visit NACD’s bookstore.