Posts Tagged ‘innovation’

Future Trends in Market Disruption

October 14th, 2014 | By

Seasoned venture capitalists during a keynote session this morning at the 2014 NACD Board Leadership Conference discussed future trends in marketplace disruption.

Scott Kupor, director of the National Venture Capital Association and managing partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, said that from an entrepreneurial standpoint, the so-called next big thing is whatever a business is doing to be innovative in their field. What many entrepreneurs are doing is streamlining the chain by which products or business ideas make it to market. They’re getting rid of the middle man.

John Backus, managing partner of venture capital firm New Atlantic Ventures, highlighted the importance of companies being aware, and staying ahead, of upcoming trends. As an example, Backus recalled a past employer, a home phone company in the 1990s that was so focused on its way of doing business that it totally missed the technological innovation of the Internet. Companies can essentially be wearing blinders, seeing only what they and their three or four nearest competitors are doing, ignoring the potential for disruptive innovation.

Kupor said his firm missed out on becoming an early investor in Airbnb.com–a San Francisco-based startup founded in 2008 that allows people to list rooms in their homes as being available for temporary rental instead of a hotel. Airbnb is now connecting people to available rooms–or couches to sleep on, in some cases–in 190 countries and more than 34,000 cities. Kupor said that the mistake that he and his team of investors made was in limiting their thinking to whether they would use the service. Their group wouldn’t, so they decided not to invest in the business; however, they later realized that many other people would use the service, so Kupor’s team later decided to invest in Airbnb.

“Big businesses have a really hard time changing the way they do business,” Backus said. “If you don’t innovate, somebody’s going to do it for you.”

Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures, said that when a company finds out about a new innovative idea, corporate directors can’t just sit in the boardroom at the strategic level and say: “We’ve got to watch that, monitor that.” A company must react.

That reaction can play out in a variety of ways, depending upon the innovation and the industry.

Backus said that in some cases, companies react with merger and acquisitions. They purchase a company whose innovation might be disruptive and competitive to their company’s strategy. Then, they can either foster that innovation and bring it to market, or–in some cases–shutter the innovation to get rid of the threat of competition.

Other companies decide to invest in research and development hubs overseas, outsourcing their innovation to less expensive and more highly concentrated development teams in other countries.

Still other companies spin off their own team of venture capitalists to travel and seek innovative technologies in which to invest.

All the panelists agreed that the key to staying ahead of marketplace trends, after becoming aware of potential innovative ideas, was to take action. In other words, innovation ignored is a bad business practice.

Leveraging the Risks and Rewards of Information Technology

May 8th, 2014 | By

As information technology (IT) continues to evolve, so do the oversight responsibilities of corporate directors. From big data analytics to social media to cybersecurity, technology creates opportunities for companies to innovate, to create operational efficiencies, and to develop a competitive advantage.

These potential rewards can bring significant risks, however. Directors have the task of ensuring technology is integrated into both company strategy and enterprise risk management—and to do so they must first gain a deeper understanding of how technology is impacting their businesses.

To help directors ensure they are prepared to leverage both the risks and rewards of IT, NACD developed an eight-part video series—The Intersection of Technology, Strategy, and Risk in partnership with KPMG and ISACA.

The series includes insights from leading technology experts and top executives from AT&T, Citigroup, Dunkin’ Brands, Kaiser Permanente, and  Oracle, among others, and focuses on critical IT areas for directors, such as:

  • how emerging technologies are altering the business landscape;
  • critical questions boards should be asking about technology;
  • the role of the CIO;
  • disruptive technologies;
  • fostering innovation;
  • balancing IT risks and opportunities;
  • cybersecurity; and
  • social media.

To complement the video series, NACD has additional resources, including white papers, articles, webinars, full transcripts of each video, and a discussion guide for directors who would like to take a deeper dive and bring these topics into their own boardrooms.

To watch The Intersection of Technology, Strategy, and Risk video series and access the supplemental resources, visit NACDonline.org/IT.

The Face of the 2020 Board

October 14th, 2013 | By

On the heels of the NACD Directorship 2020 panel, Virginia Gambale, director, JetBlue and managing partner, Azimuth Partners LLC; Helene D. Gayle, president and CEO, CARE USA; director, The Coca-Cola Co. and Colgate-Palmolive Co.; Michael D. Rochelle, founder and president, MDR Strategies LLC, director, Military Officers Association of America, trustee, U.S. Army War College Foundation; and Clara Shih, CEO, Hearsay Social and director, Starbucks, discussed the perspectives, expertise, and skill sets that will be critical for boardrooms of the future.

Gambale noted that some of the issues that will confront boards in 2020 are obvious today. Globalization, technology and innovation, the drive for transparency coupled with short-termism, and a focus on shareholder returns will require a certain expertise at the board level. To meet these challenges, Gambale suggested one valuable mindset is contextual awareness—the ability to lead and make decisions in the context of what is going on in the environment around you with the information you have.

“Another way of thinking about contextual awareness is as the intersection of situational awareness and the ability to use intuition to take advantage of opportunities,” said Rochelle. “It’s a 360-degree awareness.”

“Part of situational awareness is to ensure that in a globalized world you have the ability to speak each other’s language and talk across the divide,” explained Gayle. “We can be brokers for merging creating wealth with creating social value.”

Reinventing the Future

While some technologies, such as social media and mobile, enhance existing business models, some companies are developing technologies that will completely alter the future. Shih pointed to the examples of 3-D printing and self-driving cars, noting that embracing embrace rapid innovation can redefine the customer experience.

Directors and management will need to prepare to keep pace with evolving technology. “The bylaws in corporate governance were meant to maintain stability. We need to be aware that in that environment we need to try harder to carve out time to brainstorm about how businesses can be transformed by these technologies.”

Onboarding Future Directors

“Ensuring a board is prepared to embrace emerging technologies starts with an effective onboarding process. Boards must do a better job of thinking about diversity as more than numbers,” Gayle explained. “How do we make sure what that person has to offer is brought to light? In onboarding, we need a focus on dialogue—having a discussion about what that member brings to the table.”

In addition, considering younger directors may also prove fruitful, she continued: “We have deliberately looked for younger candidates on my board—they understand some of these worlds better.”