Archive for the ‘Risk Management’ Category

NACD’s Second Small-Cap Forum Helps Directors Understand the Risks and Responsibilities of a Growing Business

August 6th, 2014 | By

The majority of companies in the United States are small cap, defined as companies below $500 million in market capitalization. While they are rich in ingenuity, small-cap companies have unique challenges that can be daunting for any board to manage. With smaller staffs and fewer resources than their large-cap counterparts, the time and talents of company executives are spread thin in the face of pressure for fast growth in an uncertain economic environment. This July, NACD, in partnership with Epsen Fuller Group, Fenwick & West, and Latham & Watkins held its second Small-Cap Forum. Over the course of a day, a collective of experts helmed six sessions at San Francisco’s Four Seasons Hotel to dissect the directors’ role in helping to build their companies. The following are three themes that emerged from the presentations:

Plan ahead. Many small-cap companies make the mistake of placing too much emphasis on budgeting. Innovation rarely, if ever, emerges from evaluating figures. Shift gears to take a close, hard look at your company and think about creating a strategic plan. A plan should ideally map out the next five years of the company—no fewer than three—and determine what resources are needed to meet those goals. Allot plenty of time outside of regular meetings to discuss various game plans, setting milestones to review the strategy.

Work with the founder. When assessing and building out the company’s long-term goals, the board also needs to pay attention to management. Small-cap companies often have a culture centered on the founder/CEO, and while that person’s innovative and entrepreneurial drive may have been enough to give legs to a nascent business, those skills may not be aligned with the firm’s needs and goals in subsequent stages of growth. That said, the board shouldn’t write off the leadership already in place. Building support around the C-suite can help enable the CEO to succeed in an increasingly expanding role, or to step down with dignity if required. By extension, start looking within the company for talent that can take the reins in the next three to five years. Broaching this topic can be highly sensitive; however, the longer a leadership gap exists at the CEO level in a small-cap environment, the greater the risk of a succession crisis.

Mind the gaps. The purpose of board-level committees is to share the workload so that board members can effectively “divide and conquer”; however, small-cap boards are traditionally half the size of a large-cap company—so small that the same directors frequently serve on multiple committees. Stretching resources this thin means that there is zero room for non-contributing directors, or else the board runs the risk of being unable to carry out its responsibilities effectively. Small-cap boards should create a skills matrix that charts each director’s areas of expertise—and reveals where the board’s collective knowledge base may be lacking.

A small-cap board should also put forth the effort to bridge the gap between the company and its shareholders. Any opportunity to engage with and better understand your shareholder base is a good idea, and is a particular imperative in the small-company environment where ownership may be more concentrated. Also realize that many small-cap boards become targets of activist investors. Prepare for those interactions not only by doing due diligence on activists’ investment styles and track records, but also by being willing to listen to the activists’ points of view.

Look for a full recap of the Small-Cap Forum in the September/October 2014 issue of NACD Directorship magazine.

Voluntary Public-Private Partnership on Cyber-Risk Oversight

July 30th, 2014 | By

On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security selected and posted the NACD Director’s Handbook on Cyber-Risk Oversight on the Critical Infrastructure Cyber Community (C3) Voluntary Program website. At a press conference yesterday, four panelists, Ken Daly, president and CEO, NACD; Mark Camillo, head of cyber products for the Americas Region, AIG; Larry Clinton, president and CEO, ISA; and Dr. Andy Ozment, Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications, DHS, spoke generally about cybersecurity as an issue for directors, and specifically about the contents of the handbook, created by NACD in association with AIG and ISA, which focuses on cybersecurity oversight at the board level.

Larry Clinton observed that the first of two goals for combatting cyber risks at board level is to raise awareness of cybersecurity as a risk directors must oversee. NACD has been actively engaged in educating the board member community on cyber issues for some time. In summer 2013, The Art of Cyber War graced the cover of NACD Directorship, followed by coverage in subsequent issues; NACD has held multiple roundtables and events focused on cybersecurity issues, including a day-long cyber-risk summit in Chicago, and has built the topic into the flagship Master Class program. In addition to the director’s handbook, other recent NACD thought leadership includes the white paper Cybersecurity: Boardroom Implications and a video series focused on technology and cybersecurity.

On Tuesday, Dr. Ozment emphasized the fact that cyber risks affect organizations of all sizes, sectors, and industries, stating that a director who doesn’t know about cyber incidents falls into one of two categories: either “your CEO doesn’t think you care about cyber incidents,” or “your CIO doesn’t know about the cyber incidents.” He followed with, “unfortunately the bad guys are doing more for cybersecurity awareness than any one of us can do.” Clinton’s first goal, realizing the “why” of cyber-risk oversight at board level, has been scarred into directors’ understanding.

Clinton’s second goal is simple but even more challenging: we have to work together to “solve it.” According to the forthcoming 2014-2015 NACD Public Company Governance Survey, 90 percent of directors believe their boards’ understanding of cyber risk needs improvement. Though directors get the “why,” they need guidance on the “how,” advice practical to boards’ oversight of cyber risk.

The NACD Director’s Handbook on Cyber-Risk Oversight provides insight into the “how.” Daly stated that cyber “is simply another risk [that] fits within the enterprise risk management system.” Camillo indicated that the handbook’s five principles “can be used immediately” and applied to an organization’s existing ERM program:

  • Principle 1: Directors need to understand and approach cybersecurity as an enterprise-wide risk management issue, not just an IT issue.
  • Principle 2: Directors should understand the legal implications of cyber risks as they relate to their company’s specific circumstances.
  • Principle 3: Boards should have adequate access to cybersecurity expertise, and discussions about cyber-risk management should be given regular and adequate time on the board meeting agenda.
  • Principle 4: Directors should set an expectation that management establish an enterprise-wide cyber-risk management framework with adequate staffing and budget.
  • Principle 5: Board-management discussions about cyber risk should include identification of which risks to avoid, accept, mitigate, or transfer through insurance, as well as specific plans associated with each approach.

Daly further emphasized the “voluntary public-private partnership” between NACD, ISA, AIG, and DHS reflected in the fact that the handbook is the first, and currently only, private-sector document featured on the DHS C3 Voluntary Program website. The concept of cross-sector partnership to combat cyber risks is a centerpiece of the president’s 2013 executive order, Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. The handbook’s release signifies that the partnership-based approach is bearing fruit and the private sector is taking responsibility for cyber risk. Dr. Ozment agreed, stating that “managing cybersecurity is a shared responsibility,” and this handbook demonstrates widespread acceptance of the NIST cybersecurity framework. The handbook’s creators’ combined cyber, risk, and governance expertise to provide recommendations, broadly applicable to directors of all economic sectors, for combatting a national and international problem.

Through the Boardroom Lens

July 25th, 2014 | By

Directors attending the recent NACD Directorship 2020® event in Denver, Colorado engaged in group discussions about how boards can anticipate and effectively respond to environmental and competitive disruptors in the marketplace.

The half-day symposium at the Ritz-Carlton on July 15 was the second of three NACD Directorship 2020 events this year addressing seven disruptive forces and their implications for the boardroom. Summaries of the Denver speakers’ main points are available here.

Following each speaker, directors developed key takeaways for boards. Those takeaways fell within the parameters of the five elements of effective board leadership defined at last year’s NACD Directorship 2020 forums: strategic board leadership and processes, boardroom dynamics and culture, information and awareness, board composition, and goals and metrics.

Environmental Disruptor Takeaways

Strategic Board Leadership and Processes

  • Crisis response plan. Ensure that the company has a contingency plan in place that takes into account a potential environmental crisis. The plan should include how the company will respond to disruptions in the supply chain and production cycle, as well as to employees, customers, and investors.

Boardroom Dynamics and Culture

  • Culture. Boardroom culture should reflect that directors are ready and willing to be held accountable for environmental or climatological issues that arise for the company.

Information and Awareness

  • Engagement. The company should have an established communications plan to use in response to requests from shareholders and stakeholders regarding environmental matters.

Goals and Metrics

  • Green metrics. Becoming a sustainability-focused company requires adopting a long-term commitment to the cause. The board can communicate that commitment by establishing environment-related performance metrics that align with the corporate strategy.

Competitive Disruptor Takeaways

Strategic Board Leadership and Processes

  • Board agenda. Set aside time on the board agenda to discuss forward-looking strategy, so that the board’s focus is not limited to reviewing the company’s past performance.

Boardroom Dynamics and Culture

  • Culture. Fostering innovation requires risk. The culture throughout the organization should support failure and risk taking within the company’s tolerances. Also invite outside experts—or “white space” teams—to help trigger new, innovative thoughts.

Board Composition

  • Composition. Board composition should reflect a diversity of thought and experience. Regardless of background, directors should be willing to ask probing questions and stay aware of marketplace trends.

Goals and metrics

  • Understanding the marketplace. Management should be able to answer who future competitors might be and what trends might gain traction.