Archive for the ‘Corporate Social Responsibility’ Category

NACD Directorship 100: A Call for the Most Influential

April 10th, 2014 | By

Wanted: The names of corporate directors and corporate governance professionals who you believe represent the very best in corporate America. Attributes include experience, integrity, knowledge, and courage. The call for nominations for the 2014 NACD Directorship 100 is now live at www.NACDonline.org/Nominations. It takes only a moment to nominate a colleague or peer. Multiple nominations are encouraged. All NACD members are invited and encouraged to participate in our online poll.

The NACD Directorship 100 is the annual lineup of the most influential people in the boardroom and corporate governance. It is composed of 50 directors and 50 governance entities or professionals. The 2014 list, our eighth, will be published in the November/December issue of NACD Directorship and celebrated during a black-tie gala on December 3 in New York City.

Included in the NACD Directorship 100 is the call for nominations for two very special awards: the 2014 Lifetime Achievement and Public Company Director of the Year awards.

What happens once you make a nomination? Our editorial team goes to work vetting each and every candidate, checking to see that the nominee fits within our guidelines for inclusion. Directors who have already been included in a prior NACD Directorship 100 list are no longer eligible for consideration–a change adopted in 2013 to ensure that a fresh crop of directors is featured each year. The list of nominees is ratified prior to publication by the NACD board.

Questions? Please contact me at jwarner@NACDonline.org.

Michael Woodford: CEO Turned Whistleblower

October 14th, 2013 | By

Today marked an anniversary for former Olympus Corp. President and CEO Michael Woodford: the day he was fired from the camera and medical products manufacturer. What brought him to that day is a series of events that kicked off when Woodford had no choice but to blow the whistle on his own company after discovering a serious fraud.

Before being asked to assume the role of president–which he very gladly accepted–Woodford had a 30-year career at Olympus. Nevertheless, he knew that he wanted to make changes within the company, and soon into his presidency, an article in a business magazine titled Facta, ran an article about odd acquisitions Olympus had made and the high fees it paid a management consultancy.

When Woodford raised the issue with two managers in Japan about the article, he was told that CEO Tsuyoshi Kikukawa had advised them not to bring it up to Woodford. After demanding to speak to Kikukawa and Executive Vice President Hisashi Mori about the questionable acquisitions, Mori told Woodford that he worked for Kikukawa and that he was loyal to him.

Seeing no other option to raise the issue, Woodford wrote letters to the Olympus board and management and copied their auditor, Ernst & Young, on two of the letters. Instead of addressing the issue of the dubious acquisitions, the board unanimously ousted Woodford.

For more on the Olympus fraud, read an NACD Directorship magazine interview with Woodford from the March/April issue: http://www.directorship.com/exposing-fraud-at-any-cost/.

Keynote: Conscious Capitalism with Rajendra Sisodia

October 13th, 2013 | By

So much has changed, and so quickly. What will it take for businesses to truly flourish in the future? The second keynote of the 2013 NACD Board Leadership Conference was a smooth transition from NACD Chair King’s address on innovation in the boardroom with a presentation from Raj Sisodia. Conscious Capitalism Institute Co-Founder and Chairman Sisodia recently co-authored with Whole Foods Co-Founder John Mackey, Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business.

Although capitalism is suffering an image crisis following the global financial crisis, Sisodia focused on its ability to advance society as a whole. He currently consults companies on shifting from a traditional method of operations to a “conscious” one. Based on research on the impact of the industrial revolution on social well-being, Sisodia believes that business is good because it creates value. His method of conscious capitalism is based on four tenets:

1.  Business can and should be done with a higher purpose, not just maximizing profits.

2.  Conscious businesses are explicitly managed for the benefit of all their stakeholders.

3.  Conscious leaders are driven primarily by service to the firm’s purpose and people, rather than by power or money.

4. These leaders create a conscious culture, which enables and empowers employees.

Other takeaways from the session:

  • Capitalism is the most effective method to alleviate poverty. If current trends continue, extreme poverty (world population living on less than $1 a day) will be virtually eliminated in the next 50 years (if free markets are allowed to spread and be the norm).
  • “Have you ever watched a movie in which the business person is a good person?” The lack of trust in capitalism is the result of the world and humanity changing significantly in the last 20 years, yet business has not adapted.
  • In the future, companies will not be able to survive by only focusing on driving shareholder wealth. Ultimately, viewing financial profit as the end result will drive you to do things that destroy value in its path. To this end, Sisodia believes directors should focus on the corporation—not just the shareholders. In doing so, value will be created for all stakeholders.
  • Conscious capitalism is not about trade offs, but they can always be found. Although businesses create wealth, they can also destroy many kinds of wealth, including financial, social, and emotional. It matters how companies make their money.”