Archive for the ‘Business Ethics’ Category

Leading with Honor

September 29th, 2015 | By

The 2015 NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit officially opened Sunday evening with the bang of drums and the bagpipes of the St. Andrew’s Society of Washington, D.C., a local Scottish heritage association. Their performance was followed by an interactive video experience that challenged the audience to question the borders of the screen. Each of these sensory experiences underlined the theme of the year, Beyond Borders: Leadership Evolved. The opening night keynote speakers–NACD Chair Dr. Reatha Clark King, and philosopher and author, Kwame Anthony Appiah–explored how directors should weather the evolution of the boardroom.

Dr. Reatha Clark King

King is a fan of challenges. A seasoned director herself who values the good businesses can do in the world, King centered her message on all the work that boards have done to better the world around us—and the work left to do. “We have been successfully adjusting the trajectory of governance systems and have made improvements, but we still have much to do,” said King. “The board’s agenda gets longer. We offer no encouragement that the agenda will get shorter. Instead we prepare ourselves for the greater demand.”

Kwame Anthony Appiah

One of the demands King identified was the need for directors to hold fervently to core beliefs. One among the many she cited was accountability: “I am a student of the word ‘accountability,’ and it looms large in my mind for directors to understand and embrace it.” King asked the audience to also embrace leadership in challenging times in spite of the many chances to falter. Among the recommended ways to lead with strength through governance challenges were the concepts of embracing broader perspectives, finding the courage to do what’s right, and to be brave enough to change if needed.

King’s suggestions for leadership to the audience of more than 1,200 were strengthened by Kwame Anthony Appiah’s discussion on honor. Appiah is author of The Honor Code, a best-selling book that examines four points in history where honor outweighed other forces to catalyze social change for the greater good. Appiah distilled his observations on honor into applications for the boardroom and professional practice as a whole.

At the core of his message was that honor will trump money, regulation, and even the coercion of law to guide a person’s moral compass and that only honor holds up in the face of the greatest ethical challenges that inevitably arise.

Servant Leadership: An Interview With Wawa Chair Richard D. Wood Jr.

September 29th, 2015 | By

What happens when a company places service before leadership? Wawa Inc. did just that, and its chain of convenience stores has soared as a result. Jeffrey M. Cunningham, founder of NACD Directorship magazine and professor of leadership and innovation at Arizona State University, spoke with Wawa Chair Richard D. (“Dick”) Wood Jr. on the main stage at NACD’s 2015 Global Board Leaders’ Summit about the inner workings of the regional convenience-store chain that has grown into a $9 billion empire.

Richard Wood from Wawa

Originally an iron foundry established in New Jersey in 1803, the Wawa company has weathered many rounds of disruption to become one of three genuine cult businesses in the country, the other two being In-N-Out Burgers and Chic-fil-A. Wood ascribed his success at the privately-owned company that he has served since 1970 to the concepts of servant leadership and being a steward of investment in advanced technologies and innovations. A member of Wawa’s legal counsel at the beginning of his career, this descendant of the founder now serves as non-executive chair of the company’s nine-person board.

For the first half of the event, Cunningham interviewed Wood about the history of the company and Wood’s commitment to the philosophy of servant leadership. In a business context, this philosophy puts service to every stakeholder before any other facet of the enterprise. Wood takes justifiable pride in Wawa’s commitment to its 26,000 employees, including their ownership in the company. Wawa’s Employee Stock Ownership Program (ESOP) has created such value for employees at every level that the organization last year received 300,000 applications for its available 3,000 open positions. The Wawa model has proven to be profitable not in spite of but because of its commitment to family and service.

Once the conversation opened up to questions from the floor, Wood described some of the business challenges he’s faced over the years and how he has surmounted them. When asked about his reputation as “Chief Paranoia Officer” and how even good CEOs often misread the signs, Wood said, “Every time it comes back to hubris. It always comes back to hubris. CEOs didn’t have enough paranoia.”

Wood’s observations on a form of CEO self-awareness that some dub paranoia was fascinating in relation to the earlier keynote presentation by Kwame Anthony Appiah on honor’s place in business. One way that Wood practices honor in his business is to ensure that Wawa’s six core values—Value People, Delight Customers, Embrace Change, Do the Right Thing, Do Things Right, and Passion for Winning—are so thoroughly woven into the company culture that every employee can recite them; and dozens of times each month, Wawa employees recognize their peers in writing for exemplifying those values day to day. Wood’s leadership of Wawa illustrates the type of professional ethics that Appiah touched on in his keynote speech.

Before closing, Wood addressed Wawa’s next step in its innovation cycle: a move toward diesel fuel. “Two big products are going to disappear,” Wood declared. “One is cigarettes, and the other is gasoline. We’re looking into alternatives to replace a commodity we think will disappear.” To support diesel as the anticipated new market source in fuel, Wawa plans to retrofit its filling stations.

Katie Grills is assistant editor at NACD Directorship magazine.    

Beyond the Sidelines: The Impact and Legacy of the Rooney Rule

September 27th, 2015 | By

The sidelines of a football field may seem an unlikely place to look for governance best practices, but the policy implemented to diversify the coaching staffs and senior management of National Football League (NFL) teams—known as the Rooney Rule—has applications far beyond the world of sports. In the second session of the Diversity Symposium that opened this year’s NACD Global Board Leaders’ Summit, Jeremi Duru, sports-law expert and author of Advancing the Ball: Race, Reformation, and the Quest for Equal Coaching Opportunity in the NFL (2011), joined Robert E. Gulliver, executive vice president and chief human resources officer of the NFL, and Cyrus Mehri, co-lead class counsel for some of the most significant race and gender cases in U.S. history, to discuss the Rooney Rule, its impact on the NFL, and the lessons it has to offer companies in all sectors.

Rooney Rule panel

Although the NFL formed in the early twentieth century, it wasn’t until 1989 that the league hired its first African-American coach, Art Shell. Over the course of the next decade, a few other African Americans held coaching and managerial roles in the NFL, but diversity remained an issue for the league. Then, in 2002, two African-American NFL coaches with winning records were fired: Tony Dungy, whose team had reached the NFC championship playoffs in each of the three previous years, and Dennis Green, whose team was experiencing its first losing streak in 10 years.

In response, Mehri and attorney Johnny Cochran released a study demonstrating that African-American coaches were statistically more successful because by the time they were hired, these men had already spent years honing their craft in apprenticeship positions. However, African-Americans were less likely to be appointed to higher-level coaching positions and more likely to be fired when their team hit a losing streak. To address this situation, the NFL in 2003 established the Rooney Rule—named for Dan Rooney, who was then coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, a team that historically had created opportunities for minority players and coaches. The rule requires management to interview minority candidates and give them equal consideration when hiring for particular job categories.

Being attuned to diversity issues is key to attracting the best leadership, according to Robert Gulliver. As a former wealth, brokerage, and retirement HR officer at Wells Fargo & Co., Gulliver might have seemed an odd choice for a role at the NFL, but the skills he developed in the financial sector transferred easily to his work for the NFL. Gulliver emphasized that, in addition to diversity of background, diversity of perspective allows the company to connect more strongly with its consumer base.

One area in which the NFL acknowledges the need for more work is that of gender. While approximately 45 percent of football fans are women, only 30 percent of NFL employees are female. By bridging this gender gap, the league can ensure that thought leadership within the company will better reflect its customers.

What is the lasting legacy of the Rooney Rule? In the decade since the rule was adopted, the NFL has developed a culture in which diversity has become a critical element of creating a sustainable business. NFL clubs that initially resisted the rule now recognize that they would fall behind in the market if they didn’t draw from the broadest possible pool of candidates. The message is clear: make your processes inclusive, and make sure that talent rises up. In short, the Rooney Rule has proved that the more inclusive an organization is, the more it and its stakeholders benefit.